Avalanche Creek in Glacier National Park.

The Best of Glacier National Park in One Day

Hands down, the most stunning attraction is the 50-mile Going-to-the-Sun Road. A tour of the road over Logan Pass will give you a small taste of the park’s grandeur with waterfalls, hanging valleys, and sculpted peaks.

White-water rafting with Glacier Guides and Montana Raft in Glacier National Park.

River Rafting in Glacier National Park

Together, two Wild and Scenic-designated rivers provide 219 miles of recreation, including scenery, wilderness, float sections, and white water for river rafting. Camping is permitted in certain areas, and you can use the park’s resources to plan a self-guided trip or take advantage of several guide companies in the area.

Trees cluster along the steep sides of Glacier's Going-to-the-Sun-Road.

Going-to-the-Sun Road Driving Tips

Going-to-the-Sun Road isn’t Glacier’s toughest drive by far, but being prepared with snacks and water is key, as is slowing down to respect the terrain and making sure ahead of time your route is clear and open. These tips are for Glacier novices and veteran’s both.

The north fork of the Flathead River flows through the landscape on a sunny day.

Driving Tours of Glacier National Park’s North Fork

Glacier National Park’s North Fork offers two driving tours, Inside North Fork Road and Outside North Fork Road, both of which are rugged and require a certain amount of preparedness and patience—both routes can take two hours or more to travel . Whichever you choose, both are excellent tours of Glacier’s landscapes.

View of Lake McDonald from Apgar Lookout in Glacier National Park.

Discover West Glacier and Apgar

While West Glacier sprouted up outside the park along the Great Northern Railway’s line, early trapper and logger homesteads dug in a foothold at Apgar on Lake McDonald—the port to the park’s wild interior before Going-to-the-Sun Road was built. Learn more about the area’s history, early tourism and present-day amenities.