The art piece The Last Supper features ghostly life-size hollow figures against a desert background.

The Ghost Town of Rhyolite in Death Valley

Learn about the ghost town of Rhyolite in Death Valley National Park, settled in 1904 and abandoned almost completely by 1920. You’ll find plenty of intact ruins to explore, as well as a few surreal and unique sights.

A charcoal kiln used for making coal from juniper and pine in Death Valley, California.

Wildrose Charcoal Kilns and Hiking Wildrose Peak

Once used to make charcoal for the mining efforts in the area, the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns now stand as works of hand-engineered beauty. While you’re here, consider taking a hike to Wildrose Peak and be rewarded with incredible panoramic views from the windswept summit.

Ghostly plaster figures in an eerie rendition of The Last Supper. Photo © Jenna Blough.

Death Valley’s Five Strangest Places

Amidst Death Valley’s barbed desert expanses, lonesome stretches of highway, twisting dirt roads, and eternal quiet, life (and possibly even death) seems to take on a different shape. From creepy to beautiful, mysterious to moving, ridiculous to sublime, here are five of the strangest places expert author Jenna Blough has encountered in her many desert rambles.

Sand dunes in Death Valley, California.

Visit Stovepipe Wells and the Nevada Triangle

For such a small slice of Death Valley, the Nevada Triangle and Stovepipe Wells area of Death Valley National Park hold many attractions. Along with some background information, expert author Jenna Blough presents tips on planning your time and seeing the sights.

A hiker crests a sand dune in Death Valley National Park.

Eureka Dunes in Death Valley National Park

Isolated, beautiful, and pristine, the Eureka Dunes rise from the Eureka Valley floor, a gleaming mountain of sand framed by the rugged dark mountains of the Last Chance Range. Learn about the dunes and how to best enjoy them, along with directions and desert tips.

A temporarily abandoned Toyota Land Cruiser with missing (broken) front steering knuckle in a canyon above Panamint Valley.

Death Valley Desert Survival Tips

Death Valley’s vast spaces, remote roads, and weather extremes can create potentially risky situations, but traveling is not any more dangerous than in other national parks if you are prepared for the unique environment. Know what weather to expect and where you’re going, and be prepared for the unexpected.

Unpaved road through Mustard Canyon, Death Valley, California.

Death Valley Drives: Furnace Creek Area

Many visitors treat a visit to Death Valley as a car-only tour, an approach that makes sense during summer due to the extreme heat. But during spring, fall, and winter, you can experience the nuance of the desert and enjoy your own little piece of it by hiking some of the canyons or taking one of the many lightly traveled roads.

Park sign for the Klare Spring petroglyphs.

Titus Canyon Road Sights, Death Valley

If you’re looking to make a dramatic entrance into Death Valley, drive Titus Canyon Road. Aside from taking in the spectacular views that dominate the entire drive, there are some key spots to stop: the petroglyphs at Klare Spring and Leadfield ghost town. Here are your driving directions for the full trip.

A mine entrance above Panamint Valley, California.

Where to Go in Death Valley National Park

For such a supposedly barren landscape, Death Valley is absolutely full of places to go and things to see. Here are the park’s most popular and engaging sites, handily broken into easily explorable sections to help plan your visit.