Eucalyptus trees forming a natural tunnel near Koloa Kauai.

Sightseeing in Koloa, Kaua‘i

Many of the sights on the Hawaiian Islands are a combination of history and beauty, and the same holds true for sightseeing in Koloa, Kaua‘i. Two of Koloa’s main sights to see give visitors a deeper understanding of the town’s heritage, which in turn deepens appreciation of wandering its lovely landscapes.

‘Akaka Falls plunges down into a pool near Hilo, Hawaii.

‘Akaka Falls State Park on the Big Island

Everybody’s idea of a pristine Hawaiian valley is viewable at ‘Akaka Falls State Park, one of the most easily accessible forays into Hawai‘i’s beautiful interior. Many varieties of plants that would be in window pots anywhere else are giants here, almost trees.

An instructor preparing to zipline tandem with a young boy at Zip Isle on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Hamakua Coast Ziplines

Zipline rides are booming on the Big Island. While there’s lots of competition between companies on the Hamakua Coast for the best course, there’s only one certified provider. Constructed in partnership with certified engineers, this course guarantees the utmost safety for zipliners.

A large sea stack off the coast of Lanai.

Lana‘i Hiking Trails

Lana’i has plenty of hiking trails and most have something extra to offer such as unique archaeological sights or a bit of island history. The trails tend toward rugged, and there are a few that require planning ahead unless you’re eager for a challenging return trip.

Aerial view of Molokini Crater off the coast of Maui.

Snorkeling Molokini Crater

Nowhere else in Hawaii can you find waters as clear as those in Molokini Crater, a half-submerged volcanic caldera that rises from 300 feet of water. Snorkeling at Molokini is such a popular activity that if you want as much water to yourself as possible, you had best plan ahead to get there as early as possible on one of the smaller available charters.

View of an interpretive sign at the edge of Kealakekua Bay.

Beaches in the Big Island’s Captain Cook Area

Beaches near Big Island’s Captain Cook Monument are all excellent for various water sports, including rental kayaking, and two have great amenities for a full day at the beach with a packed picnic lunch. All are fairly busy beaches, even the harder-to-reach ones, so plan ahead if you’re looking for solitude.

The colorful rocky landscape of Keahiakawelo on Lanai.

Natural and Cultural Sights on Lana‘i

From cultural sights such as ancient petroglyphs and heiau, and an abandoned plantation village, to Hawaii’s last dryland forest and a naturally-occurring moonscape, sightseeing on Lana’i can be a quick browse of each or a leisurely immersion.

Aerial view of the islet of Moku Ho‘oniki off Molokai.

Moloka‘i Dive Sites and Snorkeling

The only reason you haven’t heard about the amazing diving and snorkeling in Moloka’i is because—with the exception of a few protected areas—the majority of dive and snorkel spots are best accessed from a dive boat or charter. Use these outfitters to explore Moku Ho‘oniki and other areas.

A waterfall with a large cavern behind it at Twin Falls in East Maui.

Twin Falls Hiking Trail in East Maui

Twin Falls is one of the easiest and shortest waterfall hikes you’ll find in East Maui. Although there are myriad waterfalls here, the two main ones are most accessible for visitors. Here are detailed directions to both, advice for going further along the trail, and a few area tips.