A large sea stack off the coast of Lanai.

Lana‘i Hiking Trails

Lana’i has plenty of hiking trails and most have something extra to offer such as unique archaeological sights or a bit of island history. The trails tend toward rugged, and there are a few that require planning ahead unless you’re eager for a challenging return trip.

Aerial view of Molokini Crater off the coast of Maui.

Snorkeling Molokini Crater

Nowhere else in Hawaii can you find waters as clear as those in Molokini Crater, a half-submerged volcanic caldera that rises from 300 feet of water. Snorkeling at Molokini is such a popular activity that if you want as much water to yourself as possible, you had best plan ahead to get there as early as possible on one of the smaller available charters.

The colorful rocky landscape of Keahiakawelo on Lanai.

Natural and Cultural Sights on Lana‘i

From cultural sights such as ancient petroglyphs and heiau, and an abandoned plantation village, to Hawaii’s last dryland forest and a naturally-occurring moonscape, sightseeing on Lana’i can be a quick browse of each or a leisurely immersion.

A waterfall with a large cavern behind it at Twin Falls in East Maui.

Twin Falls Hiking Trail in East Maui

Twin Falls is one of the easiest and shortest waterfall hikes you’ll find in East Maui. Although there are myriad waterfalls here, the two main ones are most accessible for visitors. Here are detailed directions to both, advice for going further along the trail, and a few area tips.

Inside the dense bamboo forest of East Maui.

Hiking in the Bamboo Forest of East Maui

This challenging hike through Maui’s bamboo forest isn’t for everyone: there are steep slopes, deep forests, and even streams to traverse, but those who manage to find and stick to the trail are well-rewarded by the experience and the waterfalls of Na‘ili‘ili haele (bamboo forest)!

The Hoapili Trail through a rocky landscape near La Perouse Bay in South Maui.

Hiking Hoapili Trail in South Maui

Anyone who heads out on the Hoapili Trail will realize right away that this isn’t your average hike. Hot and barren and set in the middle of nowhere, the Hoapili Trail isn’t as much about hiking as it is about taking a literal step back in time.

The rolling rust-colored landscape of Haleakala Crater on Maui.

Discover Upcountry Maui

Upcountry is Maui’s little secret. It’s where you throw on a light flannel and take a morning drive through the crisp mountain air, perhaps stopping to relax on the porch of a family-run coffeehouse. It’s a place to hike, sample Maui’s only vineyard, and holds the honor of Maui’s most artistic community.

A spout of water erupts through the rock on Maui's western coast.

Off the Beaten Track: Maui’s Northwestern Coast

Sightseeing along Maui’s northwestern coast is a delight for anyone interested in a little of this and a little of that. There’s a scenic drive (not for the timid with its narrow, curving roads), natural wonders that go from the actively awe-inspiring to the serene, and of course, a good dose of local culture and history.

A kitesurfer at Kanaha Beach Park in Central Maui.

Discover Central Maui

Central Maui is the first part of the island most visitors will encounter. More than just the island’s business and commercial hub, Central Maui has an underlying charm, a lot of history, and if you’re looking for a culinary scene or to step outside ‘resort Maui’, this is where to go.