Notom-Bullfrog Road. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Plan a Visit to Capitol Reef National Park

Although Capitol Reef gets far less attention than the region’s other national parks, it is a great place to visit, with excellent hiking and splendid scenery. It’s easy to spend 2-3 days camping at the park campground or staying in nearby Torrey and taking day hikes in the park’s core district. Even travelers short on time will enjoy a quick look at visitors center exhibits and the Scenic Drive, which offers access to viewpoints and hiking trails.

A shipwreck on the beach near Fort Stevens State Park. Photo © Peter Iredale/Dreamstime.

One Week in Coastal Oregon’s State Parks

Coastal Oregon has a large number of high-quality state parks. Parks are located at all of the coast’s most beautiful places, making access easy and affordable. Each of these itineraries makes for a great weekend trip, or you could combine them for a weeklong adventure.

The Virgin River cuts through Zion Canyon. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Planning Your Time in Zion National Park

Zion is a magnificent park with stunning, soaring scenery. The geology here is all about rocks and water; even rainy days can be memorable as waterfalls plunge from nearly every crevice in the cliffs above. To explore, it’s always worth spending part of a day hiking with a park ranger. The highlight for most visitors is winding through the canyon on the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive.

The Astoria Waterfront. Photo © W.C. McRae.

Foraging Oregon’s Coast

Fishing, crabbing, clamming, and mussel-gathering isn’t just fun—it will fill your dinner plate, too. There’s plenty for foragers to eat along the Oregon coast, if you know where to look for it. Here are the best places for each, along with the best times of year to guarantee a full belly.

Samuel H. Boardman Scenic Corridor. Photo © Strekoza2/Dreamstime.

Top 10 Photo Ops on the Oregon Coast

The Oregon coast is so photogenic that both professional and amateur photographers vie for the best shots, which, given coastal conditions, can be challenging. While there are stunning vistas around nearly every corner, here are some can’t-miss photo opportunities and tips for making the most of cloudy or foggy days.

Natural Bridge in Bryce Canyon. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Scenic Drive in Bryce Canyon National Park

From elevations of about 8,000 feet near the visitors center, Bryce Canyon National Park’s scenic drive gradually winds 1,100 feet higher to Rainbow Point. On a clear day, you can enjoy vistas of more than 100 miles from many of the viewpoints. Visitors wishing to see all of the viewpoints should take a walk on the Rim Trail.

Downtown Moab, Utah. Photo © WC McRae.

Planning Your Time in Moab

By far the largest town in southeastern Utah, Moab makes an excellent base for exploring Arches and Canyonlands National Parks and the surrounding canyon country. How you get around ranges from biking to horseback riding to 4WD jeep exploring to hot-air ballooning. This is also the most hospitable town in this part of Utah, so don’t blow right through. Take time to stop and enjoy its quirky charms.

Red dirt with clustered grasses in the foreground while a flat-topped arch spans across the landscape in the background.

The Variety and Splendor of Arches National Park

A concentration of rock arches of marvelous variety has formed within the maze of sandstone fins at Arches National Park, one of the most popular national parks in the United States. Bill McRae and Judy Jewell offer advice on how to plan your time and where to go to experience the best Arches has to offer.