Hole 'n the Rock. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Family-Friendly Fun in Moab, Utah

It’s fair to say that Moab doesn’t tempt travelers with a lot of traditional tourism establishments, but all you have to do is raise your eyes to the horizon. The locale is so striking that you’ll want to get outdoors and explore, and the astonishing sights of Canyonlands and Arches National Parks are just minutes from town. But there’s nothing wrong with just enjoying the enthusiastic vibe of the town.

Notom-Bullfrog Road. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Road Trip Utah’s National Parks in a Week

Despite their proximity, visiting all of Utah’s national parks is a bit complicated because of the rugged terrain and lack of roads. You must plan on a lot of driving. So get in a road-trip frame of mind, cue up some good music, and head out.

Ancient Native Americans left behind astonishing arrays of rock art throughout Utah. Photo © W.C. McRae.

Where to See Rock Art Around Moab

The fertile valley around Moab has been home to humans for thousands of years. Prehistoric rock art, granaries, and dwellings can still be seen here, as well as later native contributions. You don’t need to travel far to see excellent examples of native pictographs and petroglyphs. Expert authors W.C. McRae and Judy Jewell offer specific instructions on how to find rock art around Moab.

Notom-Bullfrog Road. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Plan a Visit to Capitol Reef National Park

Although Capitol Reef gets far less attention than the region’s other national parks, it is a great place to visit, with excellent hiking and splendid scenery. It’s easy to spend 2-3 days camping at the park campground or staying in nearby Torrey and taking day hikes in the park’s core district. Even travelers short on time will enjoy a quick look at visitors center exhibits and the Scenic Drive, which offers access to viewpoints and hiking trails.

A shipwreck on the beach near Fort Stevens State Park. Photo © Peter Iredale/Dreamstime.

One Week in Coastal Oregon’s State Parks

Coastal Oregon has a large number of high-quality state parks. Parks are located at all of the coast’s most beautiful places, making access easy and affordable. Each of these itineraries makes for a great weekend trip, or you could combine them for a weeklong adventure.

The Virgin River cuts through Zion Canyon. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Planning Your Time in Zion National Park

Zion is a magnificent park with stunning, soaring scenery. The geology here is all about rocks and water; even rainy days can be memorable as waterfalls plunge from nearly every crevice in the cliffs above. To explore, it’s always worth spending part of a day hiking with a park ranger. The highlight for most visitors is winding through the canyon on the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive.

The Astoria Waterfront. Photo © W.C. McRae.

Foraging Oregon’s Coast

Fishing, crabbing, clamming, and mussel-gathering isn’t just fun—it will fill your dinner plate, too. There’s plenty for foragers to eat along the Oregon coast, if you know where to look for it. Here are the best places for each, along with the best times of year to guarantee a full belly.

Samuel H. Boardman Scenic Corridor. Photo © Strekoza2/Dreamstime.

Top 10 Photo Ops on the Oregon Coast

The Oregon coast is so photogenic that both professional and amateur photographers vie for the best shots, which, given coastal conditions, can be challenging. While there are stunning vistas around nearly every corner, here are some can’t-miss photo opportunities and tips for making the most of cloudy or foggy days.