Magellanic penguin at sunrise at Punta Tombo Argentina

5 Reasons to Add Patagonia to Your Bucket List

In Patagonia, the imagination runs as wild as the wildlife. You probably didn’t need another reason to experience the endless diversity of its landscapes, but here are our top five to make sure this destination makes it onto your bucket list.

Two swans with black necks and bright red beaks swim through the water.

Visit Parque Nacional Laguna Blanca in Argentina

Designated a major international wetland under the Ramsar convention, Parque Nacional Laguna Blanca has a large breeding population of striking black-necked swans. It’s also the place to spot coots, ducks, grebes, gulls, upland geese, and the occasional flamingo.

A pair of Magellanic penguins at Punta Tombo, Argentina.

The Penguin March of Punta Tombo

On barren South Atlantic shores, some 200,000 pairs of Magellanic penguins waddle ashore every austral spring to nest on only 210 hectares at Punta Tombo. Learn about the Área Natural Protegida Punta Tombo and its staggering amount of both penguin and human visitors.

View of the Futaleufú river winding through the mountains.

Futaleufú: White-Water Rafting and More

With its reputation for world-class white-water rafting, Futaleufú draws outdoor recreationists like a magnet. Get more information on how to get there, outfitters, and other essentials to plan your trip.

Plan a Visit to El Bolsón, Argentina

El Bolsón, Argentine Patagonia’s counterculture capital, may be the place to replace your faded tie-dyes. It’s also a beauty spot in a fertile valley between stunning longitudinal mountain ranges ideal for hiking. Here are highlights for travelers, along with information to help plan your visit from getting there to what to see and do.

Moss grows on a bulging knot along the trunk of a larch tree.

Visit Chile’s Parque Pumalín

Parque Pumalín is a 317,000-hectare private nature reserve straddling the highway north of Chaitén. Find out more about the park including flora, geography, sights, and recreational opportunities.

Cows graze at a grassy bank at the edge of a placid river.

Discover the Wild Woodlands of the Chiloé Archipelago

The heartland of Chilean folklore, greener than Washington and Oregon, rain-soaked Chiloé is an archipelago whose wild western woodlands are darker than the Black Forest and traversed by trails leading to secluded ocean beaches with rolling dunes. Its cultural landscape is a mosaic of field and forest, and its seas yield some of Chile’s most diverse seafood.