The view from Sunset Point. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Planning Your Time in Bryce Canyon National Park

In Bryce Canyon, a geologic fairyland of rock spires rises beneath the high cliffs of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. This intricate maze, eroded from soft limestone, now glows with warm shades of red, orange, pink, yellow, and cream. The best things to do in the park are take in the visitors center exhibits, enjoy the viewpoints along the scenic drive, and spend time hiking.

Robinson Point Light. Photo © Hilary and Tom Nangle.

Acadia’s Regional Lighthouses

The best known of the Acadia region’s coastal beacons is Bass Harbor Head Light, accessible to the public during daylight hours. Here are the other still-operating lighthouses in the Acadia region. All are automated; most are accessible only by boat. Sadly, none of the light towers are accessible to the public, but most of the grounds and some nearby buildings are.

Climbers prepare to scale Acadia's granite cliffs. Photo © Hilary and Tom Nangle.

Activities in Acadia National Park

Acadia National Park is one of those parks that has something for everyone, from active outdoor adventurers to history buffs with a penchant for finding that perfect slice of solitude. Here’s the best of everything Acadia has to offer.

Notom-Bullfrog Road. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Road Trip Utah’s National Parks in a Week

Despite their proximity, visiting all of Utah’s national parks is a bit complicated because of the rugged terrain and lack of roads. You must plan on a lot of driving. So get in a road-trip frame of mind, cue up some good music, and head out.

Notom-Bullfrog Road. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Plan a Visit to Capitol Reef National Park

Although Capitol Reef gets far less attention than the region’s other national parks, it is a great place to visit, with excellent hiking and splendid scenery. It’s easy to spend 2-3 days camping at the park campground or staying in nearby Torrey and taking day hikes in the park’s core district. Even travelers short on time will enjoy a quick look at visitors center exhibits and the Scenic Drive, which offers access to viewpoints and hiking trails.

Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. Photo © Ann Marie Brown.

Sights Near Glacier Point in Yosemite

Often referred to as “the grandest view in all the West,” Glacier Point is a 7,214-foot overlook with a vista of Yosemite Valley, Half Dome and all its granite neighbors, and the High Sierra. Nearby are other amazing–and often overlooked–vistas, along with the Badger Pass Ski Area. Badger Pass is the oldest ski resort in California, great for playing in the snow or simply stopping for lunch on a sunny day.

The Virgin River cuts through Zion Canyon. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Planning Your Time in Zion National Park

Zion is a magnificent park with stunning, soaring scenery. The geology here is all about rocks and water; even rainy days can be memorable as waterfalls plunge from nearly every crevice in the cliffs above. To explore, it’s always worth spending part of a day hiking with a park ranger. The highlight for most visitors is winding through the canyon on the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive.

Neah Bay. Photo © Tim Gohrke/123rf.

One-Week Itinerary: Best of the Olympic Peninsula

One of the best parts about the Olympic Peninsula is that you don’t need to stray far from its main thoroughfare, Highway 101, to experience a good number of area highlights. Highway 101 travels around the perimeter of the peninsula and Olympic National Park, making it possible to see the best the area has to offer in a limited amount of time.