Notch-leaved phacelia (Phacelia Crenulata), along 190 north of Furnace Creek.

Plan a Visit to Furnace Creek and the Amargosa Range

Furnace Creek is the hub of Death Valley National Park, an outpost of comfort and civilization with a visitors center, accommodations, campgrounds, restaurants, and even gas. Here’s helpful advice on planning a trip to the area, including when to go and where to spend your time.

A woman walk down a caged pathway in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge.

Exploring Amargosa Valley in Death Valley

The Amargosa Valley stretches north of Death Valley Junction along Highway 124 and crosses the state line into Nevada. Here the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge offers a lovely side trip and pleasant oasis refuge from the desert.

Old brick smokestack in Death Valley, California.

Hiking Surprise Canyon in Death Valley

A good hike through Surprise Canyon averages about four hours. Many people go far over that and trek into Panamint City, but the canyon is well worth the time to explore on its own–picture relaxing with your feet in the splashing creek and a nice picnic in the shade after a good workout. Use these detailed directions and trail tips to experience all the canyon has to offer.

The art piece The Last Supper features ghostly life-size hollow figures against a desert background.

The Ghost Town of Rhyolite in Death Valley

Learn about the ghost town of Rhyolite in Death Valley National Park, settled in 1904 and abandoned almost completely by 1920. You’ll find plenty of intact ruins to explore, as well as a few surreal and unique sights.

A charcoal kiln used for making coal from juniper and pine in Death Valley, California.

Wildrose Charcoal Kilns and Hiking Wildrose Peak

Once used to make charcoal for the mining efforts in the area, the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns now stand as works of hand-engineered beauty. While you’re here, consider taking a hike to Wildrose Peak and be rewarded with incredible panoramic views from the windswept summit.

Ghostly plaster figures in an eerie rendition of The Last Supper. Photo © Jenna Blough.

Death Valley’s Five Strangest Places

Amidst Death Valley’s barbed desert expanses, lonesome stretches of highway, twisting dirt roads, and eternal quiet, life (and possibly even death) seems to take on a different shape. From creepy to beautiful, mysterious to moving, ridiculous to sublime, here are five of the strangest places expert author Jenna Blough has encountered in her many desert rambles.

Sand dunes in Death Valley, California.

Visit Stovepipe Wells and the Nevada Triangle

For such a small slice of Death Valley, the Nevada Triangle and Stovepipe Wells area of Death Valley National Park hold many attractions. Along with some background information, expert author Jenna Blough presents tips on planning your time and seeing the sights.

A hiker crests a sand dune in Death Valley National Park.

Eureka Dunes in Death Valley National Park

Isolated, beautiful, and pristine, the Eureka Dunes rise from the Eureka Valley floor, a gleaming mountain of sand framed by the rugged dark mountains of the Last Chance Range. Learn about the dunes and how to best enjoy them, along with directions and desert tips.