A temporarily abandoned Toyota Land Cruiser with missing (broken) front steering knuckle in a canyon above Panamint Valley.

Death Valley Desert Survival Tips

Death Valley’s vast spaces, remote roads, and weather extremes can create potentially risky situations, but traveling is not any more dangerous than in other national parks if you are prepared for the unique environment. Know what weather to expect and where you’re going, and be prepared for the unexpected.

Unpaved road through Mustard Canyon, Death Valley, California.

Death Valley Drives: Furnace Creek Area

Many visitors treat a visit to Death Valley as a car-only tour, an approach that makes sense during summer due to the extreme heat. But during spring, fall, and winter, you can experience the nuance of the desert and enjoy your own little piece of it by hiking some of the canyons or taking one of the many lightly traveled roads.

Park sign for the Klare Spring petroglyphs.

Titus Canyon Road Sights, Death Valley

If you’re looking to make a dramatic entrance into Death Valley, drive Titus Canyon Road. Aside from taking in the spectacular views that dominate the entire drive, there are some key spots to stop: the petroglyphs at Klare Spring and Leadfield ghost town. Here are your driving directions for the full trip.

A mine entrance above Panamint Valley, California.

Where to Go in Death Valley National Park

For such a supposedly barren landscape, Death Valley is absolutely full of places to go and things to see. Here are the park’s most popular and engaging sites, handily broken into easily explorable sections to help plan your visit.

A red-rock bridge spans the trail at Natural Bridge, near Furnace Creek, California.

One Week Itinerary: The Best of Death Valley

This detailed 7-day itinerary takes you to all the best of Death Valley, from its most popular sights, notable landscapes, hikes, and more. You’ll have options for hotels and camping along the way, and you will need a rental vehicle to make the drive to and through the valley.

Sunrise at Dante's View, looking out over Death Valley, California.

Accessible Sights and Drives in Death Valley

These recommended destinations in Death Valley National Park include drives and sights easily seen from parking areas as well as two ADA-accessible trails. Roads are paved or graded dirt, and in most cases there are no formal parking spaces.

View of eroded badlands from Zabriskie Point, Death Valley.

Best Death Valley Hikes

While there are few maintained trails, old mining roads, narrow canyons, and natural features offer spectacular opportunities for hiking in Death Valley. Here’s where to go, how to get there, and the amazing views and landscapes you’ll experience.

A wooden boardwalk borders a crystal blue spring in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge.

Death Valley’s Hidden Springs and Desert Oases

The most surprising feature in Death Valley may be the presence of wetlands. These rare environments support distinct fish populations and provide life-giving watering holes, and are a sight to see surrounded by much rougher, barren landscapes.

The vast salt flats of Badwater Basin are the lowest point in North America at 282 feet below sea level.

The Best of Death Valley in One Day

If you only have one day to spend in Death Valley, this driving tour of the park will help you experience some of the most iconic sights, stretch your legs, and even enjoy a back-road adventure. Fill your gas tank before entering the park, and be sure to have plenty of food and water on hand, as services are limited.