Atlanta for LGBT Travelers

Atlanta has long been recognized as the gay capital of the Southeast, a tolerant oasis that draws queer residents and tourists from all over the country. Find information on bars, clubs, gay-friendly shops, and more.

Get Outside: Visit Nashville’s Parks

Nashville’s Metro Parks department oversees 12,000 acres of open space, including dog parks, swimming pools, tennis courts, walking trails, disc golf courses, and spray parks. Discover more about the city’s best parks.

Moon Kentucky

Native Kentuckian Theresa Dowell Blackinton gives readers an insider’s look at the Bluegrass State, from the revelry of the Kentucky Derby Festival to quiet, cool Mammoth Cave. Blackinton provides suggestions for unique trip itineraries, including Horsin’ Around, Traveling the Bourbon Trail, and The Best of the Bluegrass State. Complete with tips on where to find […]

The North Carolina Historic Barbecue Trail

The North Carolina Historic Barbecue Trail features two dozen renowned barbecue pits and joints that serve true barbecue: cooked over live coals, never on a gas grill or in an electric oven.

Historic Lighthouses of North Carolina

North Caroline’s historic lighthouses—some still in operation—are popular destinations for visitors. Most are open for climbing and offer fantastic views. The following are some of the state’s favorites.

Sights in the Greater Nashville Area

A car is necessary to reach some of Nashville’s farther-flung sights, but it is worth filling up the tank for these recommended locations. Read on for more about touring Tennessee State University or The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson’s plantation and home.

Where to Go in North Carolina

If you have a weekend, pick one special natural area to explore: the Outer Banks, beaches near Wilmington, the Blue Ridge Parkway, or the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Here’s an overview of the different regions of North Carolina to help you plan your trip.

Civil Rights History: Nashville Sit-ins

Greensboro, North Carolina, is often considered as the site of the first sit-ins of the American civil rights movement. But, in truth, activists in Nashville carried out the first “test” sit-ins in late 1959. Read on to learn more about Nashville’s role in peaceful demonstrations in the Civil Rights movement.