• Corn Island, Nicaragua - Panga Fishing Boats - banner - Robert Lerich - 123rf

Nicaragua Travel Guide

Experience languid afternoons and daring, imaginative adventures.

Discover Nicaragua

Framed both by an Atlantic coastline of remote mangrove labyrinths and by a Pacific coast stretch of surf-washed bays and beaches, Nicaragua offers a still-maturing travel industry of chic new hotels, clubs, and restaurants; Granada is a blossoming ex-pat hotspot.

While the casual traveler can certainly appreciate the familiar comforts between a horse ride among the villas and a homecooked meal in the company of friendly hosts, the majority of Nicaragua travel requires a patient spirit, one willing to make the necessary compromises in the name of adventure. Daring independents–especially those with some conversational Spanish and a willingness to use it–can find some of life’s greatest adventures amongst the volcanic heat and Caribbean cool of Nicaragua’s diverse landscape.

Check out the suggested itineraries, the where-to-gos and what-to-dos, because even the most independent of adventurous souls need a good place to get started.

See all Nicaragua content →

Featured Guidebook

Moon Nicaragua, 6th ed.


Travel Maps of Nicaragua

Download free, printable maps of Nicaragua for your personal use.

Currently available from the pages of our travel guides are over thirty maps of Nicaragua. Maps cover the cities of Granada and Managua, San Juan del Sur and the Southwest Coast, the diving hotspot of the Corn Islands, and more.

See all Nicaragua maps →

Color map of Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Map of The Solentiname Islands, Nicaragua

The Solentiname Islands

Get Inspired With Our Most Recent Nicaragua Articles

Here are our four most recent articles to get you started or you can browse all Nicaragua content.

The tops of wreckage emerge from the turquoise water at Nicaragua's Corn Islands.

Diving Nicaragua’s Corn Islands

Three distinct layers of reef, composed of more than 40 species of coral, protect the north side of Big Corn Island. The diving and snorkeling are impressive, and divers regularly see nurse sharks, eagle rays, and lots of colorful fish. The wilder Little Corn Island’s delicate reef system is unique for its abundance of wildlife and coral formations, including overhangs, swim-throughs, and the infamous shark cave.

Sunset in Solentiname. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

San Fernando and the Solentiname Islands

Solentiname’s best-known attraction is the creativity of its inhabitants, so don’t expect a lot of tourist infrastructure. Take a fully guided, four-day exploration of the entire Solentiname archipelago and the Río Papaturro in Los Guatuzos, including all its natural, archaeological, and cultural attractions.

Bilwi's main dock. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

Planning Your Time in Puerto Cabezas and the Río Coco

Isolated from the rest of Nicaragua by vast tracts of inaccessible forest and coastline, the municipality of Puerto Cabezas, its capital Bilwi, and the Río Coco watershed are remote and wild. Tourism is undeveloped throughout this region, which for some travelers makes it all the more enticing.

Penas Blancas in the Bosawás Biosphere Reserve. Photo © Rebecca Ore (Own work), licensed CC BY-SA 3.0.

Hiking Bosawás Biosphere Reserve

North of Managua, Bosawás Biosphere Reserve is the largest uninterrupted tract of primary rainforest north of the Amazon. Any trip in Bosawás is a serious backcountry undertaking and should not be attempted without proper supplies, some wilderness experience, a tolerance for dampness and discomfort, and a basic survival instinct. Guides are both obligatory and absolutely necessary.