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Nicaragua Travel Guide

Experience languid afternoons and daring, imaginative adventures.

Discover Nicaragua

Framed both by an Atlantic coastline of remote mangrove labyrinths and by a Pacific coast stretch of surf-washed bays and beaches, Nicaragua offers a still-maturing travel industry of chic new hotels, clubs, and restaurants; Granada is a blossoming ex-pat hotspot.

While the casual traveler can certainly appreciate the familiar comforts between a horse ride among the villas and a homecooked meal in the company of friendly hosts, the majority of Nicaragua travel requires a patient spirit, one willing to make the necessary compromises in the name of adventure. Daring independents–especially those with some conversational Spanish and a willingness to use it–can find some of life’s greatest adventures amongst the volcanic heat and Caribbean cool of Nicaragua’s diverse landscape.

Check out the suggested itineraries, the where-to-gos and what-to-dos, because even the most independent of adventurous souls need a good place to get started.

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Featured Guidebook

Moon Nicaragua, 6th ed.


Travel Maps of Nicaragua

Download free, printable maps of Nicaragua for your personal use.

Currently available from the pages of our travel guides are over thirty maps of Nicaragua. Maps cover the cities of Granada and Managua, San Juan del Sur and the Southwest Coast, the diving hotspot of the Corn Islands, and more.

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Color map of Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Map of The Solentiname Islands, Nicaragua

The Solentiname Islands

Get Inspired With Our Most Recent Nicaragua Articles

Here are our four most recent articles to get you started or you can browse all Nicaragua content.

Kayaks at Laguna de Apoyo. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

Adrenaline Rush in Nicaragua

Athletes and extreme sports fanatics can easily meet their needs in Nicaragua. From uphill biking and scuba diving to white-water rafting and volcano boarding and everything between, here’s where to go to get your adrenaline rush.

Río San Juan near El Castillo. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

Río San Juan: Whose River Is It?

Nicaragua has long disputed Costa Rica’s territorial rights to free use of the Río San Juan, while Costa Rica disputes Nicaragua’s claim that the river is entirely Nicaraguan territory. Despite both countries accepting a ruling by the International Court of Justice in 2009, the conflict continues.

Volcán Maderas is a pleasant volcano to climb. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

Nicaragua’s Volcanic Landscape

Nicaragua’s nickname, “The Land of Lakes and Volcanoes,” evokes its primary geographical features: two great lakes and a chain of impressive and active volcanoes; these water and volcanic resources have had an enormous effect on its human history. The country has about 40 volcanoes, a half dozen of which are usually active at any time. Running parallel to the Pacific shore, Nicaragua’s volcanoes are a part of the Ring of Fire that encompasses most of the western coast of the Americas, the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, Japan, and Indonesia.

Reserva Charco Verde. Photo © Elizabeth Perkins.

Where to Go in Nicaragua

Unless you have a few weeks to dedicate to your travels, it’s impossible to see everything Nicaragua has to offer–even then, you’d have a tight schedule. The best way to tackle the country is to learn about each region, then plan according to your interests and favorite activities. From vibrant nightlife to exploring history to outdoor adventures, Nicaragua won’t disappoint.