A puffin in North Iceland. Photo © Bjorn Ludviksson/Dreamstime.

Iceland’s Animals

Iceland may not be known for its land mammals—other than sheep, cows, horses, reindeer, and arctic fox—but animals in the ocean and sky are varied and ample. Here’s a look at what you’ll find in the water and the air; whale- and bird-watchers will be delighted with the sheer number of species!

Jaguars have spots within spots, or rosettes, and are larger than leopards. Photo © brezina123.

Balam: Jaguars in Guatemala

The Maya had great respect and reverence for the jaguar, which they called balam. Jaguars were a symbol of power and strength and were believed to act as mediums for communication between the living and the dead. Scientists have been studying jaguars in the Maya Biosphere Reserve, but luckily, you don’t need to go traipsing through the jungle to see one: Guatemala City’s excellent zoo has jaguars, as does Petén’s ARCAS wildlife rescue center.

Moving your dog to New Zealand will cost you. Photo © Eli Duke, licensed Creative Commons usage.

Moving Your Pet to New Zealand

It’s hard to say goodbye to a pet, but it can be very complicated to immigrate to New Zealand with one. Before you make a decision about bringing your pet with you, ensure you’re well-informed and take all of these issues into consideration.

Coqui tree frogs. Photo © Panachai Cherdchucheep/123rf.

Puerto Rico’s Coqui Tree Frog

There is one sweet sound unlike any other that you can hear throughout the island of Puerto Rico at night, and that is the song of the coqui tree frog. Rarely seen but often heard, these tiny translucent amphibians are the beloved mascot of the island.

Red-eyed tree frog at Parque Reptilandia. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Things to Do in and Around Dominical

Dominical is a tiny laid-back resort favored by surfers, backpackers, and the college-age crowd. The beach is beautiful albeit pebbly, and the warm waters attract whales and dolphins close to shore. If you overdose on the sun, sand, and surf, head into the lush mountains inland of Dominicalito or head east on a paved road that leads to San Isidro, winding up through the valley of the Río Barú into the Fila Costanera mountains, where you may find yourself amid swirling clouds.

A mantled howler monkey, Alouatta palliata, eating leaves in Cahuita National Park, Costa Rica, Central America.

Monkeys in Costa Rica

The liveliest and most vocal rainforest tenants, there are four species of monkeys found in Costa Rica: the white-faced (or capuchin), howler, spider, and squirrel. Their daily habits are as varied as the wide range of habitats they occupy, from the rainforest canopy to the scrubby undergrowth of the dry forests, though each species has its own niche and the species seldom meet.

A tapir in Costa Rica's Corcovado National Park.

Animals Found in Costa Rica

Anyone who has traveled in the tropics in search of wildlife can tell you that disappointment comes easy. But Costa Rica is one place that lives up to its reputation. Costa Rica is nature’s live theater—and the actors aren’t shy. Learn about the hundreds of animals you’re likely–and not–to spot in Costa Rica.

The Anegada rock iguana is making a comeback, thanks to the iguana head-start program. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Anegada’s Iguana Head-Start Facility

Thanks to BVI government efforts, the critically endangered Anegada rock iguana–once outnumbering people on the island–is making a strong comeback. Learn about the iguana head-start facility and its efforts to save the species. Since iguanas in the wild are incredibly shy, this facility is also your best chance to see one, and it’s well worth it to visit.

Jaguar lounging in Belize. Photo © Lebawit Lily Girma.

Hiking Cockscomb Basin in Belize

The main draw of the Cockscomb Basin is the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, commonly called the “Jaguar Preserve.” The area is alive with wildlife and hiking opportunities, from an easy hour-long stroll along the river to a four-day Victoria Peak expedition. Here’s how to get to the preserve, the best hiking trails, and necessary preparations for staying overnight.

Judy Arroyo with rescued sloths at the Sloth Sanctuary. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Costa Rica Nature Reserves: Puerto Limón to Cahuita

Nature reserves south of Puerto Limón in Colombia tend to be remote and undeveloped, making them perfect for adventure travel. The one exception is the world’s only sloth sanctuary, an education and research center based around rehabilitating rescued sloths that amounts to a highly-fulfilling experience for visitors.