Buildings cut from rock in Cappadocia.

Booking Accommodations in Turkey

Before booking accommodations in Turkey, make sure you fully understand the ratings system to avoid unhappy surprises when you arrive, as the star-class system used isn’t standardized. Turkish travel expert Leeane Murphy shares tips for finding the best rates, understanding what’s included in your booking, and other handy advice.

Olive trees on a hillside in Turkey.

Turkish Olives and Olive Oil

In 2013, Turkey became the fifth-largest olive oil producer in the world. Turkish olives are so different—and prized so highly for the oil they make—than those cultivated in the rest of Europe because of the sandy soil in which the trees grow, the prevalence of a sea breeze, and the sheer variety of the fruits.

Turkish Angora cats are known for their heterochromatic eyes.

Wildlife Native to Turkey

Turkey is a natural habitat for a wide variety of animals. Europe in its entirety is home to 60,000 species, while Turkey has 80,000, not counting subspecies. From migratory birds to ancient species of lions to two almost extinct sea creatures, here’s a little about Turkey’s wonderful native wildlife.

Tamarisk trees growing on the banks of the Colorado River as it cuts through a canyon in Utah.

Environmental Issues in Utah’s National Parks

While Utah’s national parks have generally been shielded from the environmental issues that play out in the rest of the state, increasing popularity has seen a rise of several environmental issues. Do your part by being aware of the issues outlined here.

Clear turquoise water on the Aegean coast of Turkey.

Turkey’s Regional Climates

Turkey’s four western and central regions all have different climates. Year-round there’s some variation as well, so to help plan when and where you’d like to visit, here’s what to expect in the Marmara, Aegean, Mediterranean, and Anatolian areas.