Makapu‘u marks the rugged and dry eastern tip of O‘ahu.

Sightseeing Southeastern O‘ahu

Nature rules sightseeing on southeastern O‘ahu, with some breathtaking views and a truly stunning garden along with a bit of hiking and an impressively massive heiau. Expect to do a lot of walking when seeing these sights.

Kamaole III Beach is home to ‘u‘au kani (wedge-tailed shearwaters).

Bird-Watching in South Maui

If there were a bird to be associated with South Maui it would be the Pacific golden plover, or kolea. For the opportunity to sight this migratory bird and other native species, there are a few locales to check out, some well-known and one often overlooked gem.

Flowers grow along a path with the verdant hills of Manoa Valley visible.

Honolulu Hiking and Birding

Honolulu bird-watching is specifically tied to hiking, as the best spots to sight forest birds are along the many trails. Each location here has half a dozen route or more, usually easily combined for a longer hike and customizable by terrain, so you can have as easy or as difficult a hike as you’d like.

You can hike to Ka‘ena Point, the western tip of the island, from the North Shore.

North Shore O‘ahu Hiking, Biking and Bird-Watching

O‘ahu’s north shore has three trails with excellent views that range from moderate to intermediate based on conditions and difficulty, and biking is similar. Bird-watchers aren’t left out with a dedicated 164 acres of prime territory with guided tours available.

A pandanus palm at the Arboretum. Photo © Malcolm Manners, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

On the Wild Side: Bermuda’s Nature Reserves

Bermuda may seem like a manicured garden, but many parishes maintain national parks and nature reserves perfect for travelers interested in seeing Bermuda’s wilder side. Often these parks and reserves are excellent hiking and bird-watching spots as well.

View of the ocean stretching to the horizon as seen from Diamond Head summit on Oahu.

Hiking, Biking and Bird-Watching in Waikiki

If you know where to go, biking around Waikiki can be a great alternative to searching out parking. There’s also one truly excellent bird-watching spot, and you won’t need a pair of hiking boots during your stay even if you do plan on trekking the two trails on offer.