Kualapu‘u Cookhouse is one of the few places to grab a bite on Moloka‘i.

Where to Eat on Moloka‘i

Though choices for where to eat on Moloka‘i are limited, that at least makes it easy to decide. You’re not going to find anything fancy here; laid-back, filling plate lunches and do-it-yourself picnics from the market are Moloka‘i’s culinary speed.

Morning coffee at the Four Seasons Lodge at Koele.

Where to Eat in Lana‘i

If you’re wondering where to eat in Lana‘i, your first choice is do you want to go low-key and local with a quick, satisfying bite to eat, or would you prefer a dining experience with an atmosphere as elegant as your meal? Lana‘i has it all.

Locals will point you to Pa‘ia Fish Market, where lines stretch out the door for the popular ono and mahi burgers.

Where to Eat in Pa‘ia, Maui

Home to some of the best seafood on the island, a decent selection of cuisines and budgets, and an abundance of local color, where to eat in Pa‘ia is a challenge if you’ll be in town for only one meal. Aim for lunch and dinner to really enjoy the selection.

A cone of shave ice in rainbow colors from Matsumoto's in Haleiwa.

Where to Eat in Hale‘iwa, O‘ahu

Finding something to tempt your tastebuds is no trouble in Hale‘iwa. There’s a good mix of easy standbys such as burgers, pizza, and sushi—expect those to come with a touch of local flavor—plus options for sit-down or to-go meals and quick treats.

Toasted ravioli is quintessentially St. Louis.

The Best Places to Eat in St. Louis

St. Louis has shaken off its reputation as a culinarily timid town. Here are some of the city’s “bests,” including the best places for small plates, soul food, burgers, gourmet experiences, barbecue, and more.