Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

Lake Superior’s Alger Underwater Preserve

There are several wrecks concentrated in one area of the Alger Underwater Preserve, and the cold, pristine water keeps them from deteriorating. Both divers and nondivers alike can view the wrecks and ruins through dive charters and boat tours.

Diving the First Cathedral in Lana‘i.

Diving Lana‘i’s Cathedrals

Those familiar with Hawaii diving will know that Lana‘i has some of the best diving in the state. While there are no fewer than 14 named dive sites along the southwestern coastline, the two which make Lana‘i famous are First and Second Cathedral.

The dive site known as China Walls is a vertical wall that drops off the south side of Koko Head and reaches down to depths of 75 feet.

Diving in Southeastern O‘ahu

Diving in southeastern O‘ahu is stellar, with a handful of complete dive shops offering sales, rentals, and dive excursions at a range of prices. The wealth of dive sites includes the area known as China Walls, a deep vertical wall drop with countless nooks and crannies, and several wreck sites now home to dozens of species.

Another nice shore dive is the Ahihi Kinau cove.

Dive Sites in Makena and Beyond

In addition to being one of the best shore dives in Makena, Nahuna/Makena Landing/5 Caves/5 Graves also takes the cake as the spot with the greatest number of names. Another nice shore dive is the Ahihi Kinau cove. Since this cove is protected from the wind, it offers pristine diving conditions as long as the surf isn’t up.

Of all the beaches in Wailea, the best for a morning shore dive is the point at Ulua Beach.

Wailea Dive Sites and Rentals

Wailea offers shore dives with shallow depths perfect for novices, with entry points that are sandy and easy. Expect to see a number of Hawaiian green sea turtles along with healthy coral formations, endemic reef fish, and perhaps a rare spotted eagle ray or spiny lobster.

The wreck of the HMS Vixen. Photo © Gary Parker/123rf.

Bermuda Shipwreck Dive Sites

Bermuda is known as the shipwreck capital of the Atlantic. Most of these unfortunate vessels, from treasure-laden galleons to U.S. Civil War-era steamers, lie less than 60 feet deep, making accessibility a breeze.