Man under palm trees on beach

Brazil’s Homegrown Tourism Boom

While prices for food, accommodations, and transportation have risen considerably in Brazil, at the same time, the emergence of a new lower-middle class with more disposable income has resulted in an unprecedented number of Brazilians traveling, both abroad and at home.

Travelers stand at a small kiosk to exchange money with a teller.

Peso Problems Precipitate PR Crisis

Argentina’s money scenario keeps getting stranger and more unpredictable. Concerned about capital flight and its ability to pay the bills, the government of president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is intensifying restrictions on foreign currency purchases, but it’s made some serious missteps.

A black and white propaganda poster in Japanese.

U.S. is the Number One Source of Immigrants to Brazil

Thinking of working abroad? Consider Brazil. More and more people are moving there as a result of Brazil’s growing economy, coupled with a severe lack of skilled workers and the economic crises wreaking havoc (and unemployment) in the United States and Europe.

Brazil Keeps its Cool as World Cup Deadlines Loom

Even though there are still two years to go before Brazil kicks off its much anticipated hosting duties of the 2014 World Cup, not a day goes by where the looming event is not mentioned in the press or comes up in the most innocuous and casual conversations.

Front and back of bank notes worth 1000 pesos from Chile

Money Matters: Exchange Rate Update

Money is everyone’s concern, especially when traveling overseas, and getting accustomed to foreign currency, knowing where and when to change it, and calculating what things cost can be challenge even when it’s a country you know well. That’s why paying attention to exchange rates is extremely important.

SESC and the City

Created in 1946, SESC is a private nonprofit organization whose role – to improve workers’ lives via access to education, culture, health, and recreation – is included in the Brazilian constitution and whose funding is assured by a 1.5 percent payroll tax imposed on Brazilian companies.