A small red eyed frog sits perched on a broad leaf.

Protecting Costa Rica’s Land

While much of Costa Rica has been stripped of its forests, the country has managed to protect a larger proportion of its land than any other country in the world. Today, one-third of land is legally set aside as national parks and forest reserves, “buffer zones,” wildlife refuges, and indigenous reserves. Throughout the country, representative sections of all the major habitats and ecosystems are protected.

A stork in Tram Chim National Park. Photo © Dana Filek-Gibson.

The Plants and Animals of Vietnam

Vietnam is home to countless varieties of flora and fauna. From the peaks of Sapa all the way down to the watery Mekong Delta, the country’s range of climates and habitats lends itself to an equally diverse array of plant and wildlife. However, with an ever-growing population and a rapid pace of development, many of Vietnam’s plant and animal species are in danger.

Old, rusted car in junkyard on Maui, Hawaii.

Dealing with Waste on the Hawaiian Islands

It’s not so easy to move heavy or big items across the ocean. While this makes Hawaii a thrift-store and vintage paradise, dealing with waste on an island is a continuous challenge. Some locals tackle the problem creatively, such as reusing old or broken bicycles to build new custom models.

A green anole perches on a red Ti leaf.

The Effect of Introduced Species in Hawaii

Before settlement, Hawaii had no fruits, vegetables, coconut palms, edible land animals, conifers, mangroves, or banyans. Learn how introduced species have thrived, at times for better and other times for worse.

Amongst the ecologically fragile mangroves of La Tirana, Jiquilisco.

El Salvador’s Coastal Mangrove Forests

There are two major mangrove forests on El Salvador’s coast: Barra de Santiago in the west, and Bahía de Jiquilisco in the east. The mangroves are one of the most biologically complex ecosystems on earth, and, as highly effective carbon sinks, front-line defense against climate change.

A Laysan albatross and its chick on Oahu.

Human Impact on O‘ahu’s Environment

Human impact on O‘ahu’s environment is a sticky issue: artificial constructs can both destroy and preserve its natural beauty, and it’s worth noting that same constructs wouldn’t become necessary except for human interference in the first place. Nowhere is this impact more obvious than on O’ahu’s beaches.

In the 1940s an environmental tragedy nearly wiped out the Bermuda cedar.

The Bermuda Cedar

The Bermuda cedar (Juniperus bermudiana) is a symbol of survival for islanders, who have depended on the sturdy evergreen from the first days of human habitation on Bermuda. Nearly wiped out in the 1940s, the cedar is slowly making a comeback thanks to strong reforesting efforts.

Tamarisk trees growing on the banks of the Colorado River as it cuts through a canyon in Utah.

Environmental Issues in Utah’s National Parks

While Utah’s national parks have generally been shielded from the environmental issues that play out in the rest of the state, increasing popularity has seen a rise of several environmental issues. Do your part by being aware of the issues outlined here.

Baby tortoises at the Charles Darwin Station in the Galapagos.

How to Travel Responsibly in the Galápagos

The Galápagos Islands is a remarkable place in danger of being ruined by its own fame. If seeing the Galápagos is on your bucket list, it’s time to consider how you can visit this amazing place without contributing to its demise.