A sloping stone wall and a flaglike sculpture with the figure of a man are mirrored in a reflecting pool.

Brasília’s Top Sights

It will take you a full day at minimum to visit Brasília’s architectural marvels. Although most are located along the Eixo Monumental, its length, coupled with the inevitably scalding sun, means you’ll have to combine walking with buses and taxis to get from one end to the other.

SESC and the City

Created in 1946, SESC is a private nonprofit organization whose role – to improve workers’ lives via access to education, culture, health, and recreation – is included in the Brazilian constitution and whose funding is assured by a 1.5 percent payroll tax imposed on Brazilian companies.

Argentines’ Dollar Crisis Deepens

While flying from Buenos Aires to Santiago in 2002, Wayne Bernhardson found himself seated next to an Argentine, bound for New York on business who, because his government had frozen bank accounts, found himself cashless. Now, ten years later, history may be repeating itself for foreign-bound Argentines.

Bahia’s Police Strike

As a result of a state-wide strike of Bahia’s military police that began on February 1, Salvador was prey to random looting, blocked highways, soaring homicide levels, and a sudden and general malaise among the population that oscillated between subtle tension and full-blown panic.

Invading Rio’s Rocinha

This week, everybody in Brazil – and especially in Rio de Janeiro – was talking about the “peaceful” police invasion of Rocinha, the largest – and most (in)famous – favela in the Americas.

View down into Guanabara Bay with the round peak of Sugarloaf Mountain rising from the peninsula.

Flying Down to Rio with the Obamas

Shortly after Obama was sworn in as president, polls showed that Brazilians’ “good opinion” of the U.S. had shot up to 73 percent. Brazilians – an estimated 45 percent of whom can claim some African descent – celebrated the victory of the “black candidate” as if Carnaval had suddenly been proclaimed in November.

Transpantaneira dirt road and sign

Eyes Peeled on the Transpantaneira

In 1972, the Brazilian military government began concretizing its ambitious if foolhardy idea of building a highway that would cut right through the Brazilian Pantanal. The highway known as the Transpantaneira never got very far, but what it lacks in terms of people, it more than makes up for in terms of wildlife.

Fancy, luxury hotel with pool

The Lap of Luxury in Brazil

What constitutes the “concept” of luxury these days – in general, and in Brazil? A question Michael asked himself when he landed what many people (including me) would consider to be a dream gig – reviewing luxury hotels in Brazil.