Off-street art gallery in Cuba. Photo © Brian Snelson, licensed Creative Commons usage.

Where to Find Cuban Arts and Crafts

The Cuban government bans the sale and export of antiques. Hence, there are no stores selling antiques to tourists. Fortunately, there are an abundance of galleries and markets that feature handmade items and artworks, from souvenir-style trinkets and kitsch to collectable pieces.

Mojitos at Dos Hermanos. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Bars and Lounge Clubs in Habana Vieja, Havana

Whether you’re looking for ambiance, to mingle with the locals, or just a stiff drink, Habana Vieja is the place to go. From chic and trendy lounges to waterfront saloons and hole-in-the-wall bars, here’s where to go to wet your whistle in Habana Vieja.

Hostal del Ángel. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

The Best Casas Particulares in Havana

Havana is blessed with accommodations of every stripe. The most enjoyable are arguably private room rentals (casas particulares) of a single room in restored buildings full of ambiance or an entire suite of rooms offering an intimate, unique experience. Of the many available, here are Havana’s best.

Sexy Las Vegas-style cabarets, such as Tropicana, remain a staple of Cuban entertainment. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Where to Catch Havana’s Cabarets Espectáculos

Spectacular, gaudy, decadent, or a combination of all three, Havana’s cabarets espectáculos definitely deliver. From the incredible and infamous two-hour show at the Las Vegas style Tropicana nightclub to small campy shows followed by steamy disco, here’s where to go to experience it all.

Jazz cafe in Havana. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Havana’s Jazz Scene

Havana’s jazz scene is hopping with plenty of prime nightlife and supper club acts as well as matinee and afternoon performances. Here’s where to go for the local greats and young up-and-comers.

Entrance gate to the United Hebrew Congregation Cemetery in Guanabacoa, Cuba.

Jewish History and Heritage Sites in Cuba

A brief look at Jewish history in Cuba from the arrival of Luis de Torres in 1492 as the first Jew in Cuba to the high point of the community mid-20th century to today. A handful of Jewish heritage sites remain open to the public, including Cuba’s oldest synagogue and a Holocaust museum.

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Sights in Zulueta (Calle Agramonte)

Calle Agramonte, more commonly referred to by its colonial name of Zulueta, is home to several sights worth making time to see. Especially make time to see the museums in the area, one dedicated to the history of the revolution, one to antique firefighting memorabilia, and one to Cuban artwork of all kinds.