The best way to experience Kaua’i's Na Pali Coast is the 11-mile Kalalau Trail.

Hiking Na Pali Coast, Kaua’i

What may be the best way to experience Kaua’i’s Na Pali Coast is the 11-mile Kalalau Trail. There are several beautiful places to stop along the way to rest and refresh yourself, or to break the trail down into smaller—but not less challenging—chunks.

Makapu‘u marks the rugged and dry eastern tip of O‘ahu.

Sightseeing Southeastern O‘ahu

Nature rules sightseeing on southeastern O’ahu, with some breathtaking views and a truly stunning garden along with a bit of hiking and an impressively massive heiau. Expect to do a lot of walking when seeing these sights.

The predominant foliage in Volcanoes National Park is ‘ohi‘a, which contrasts with the bleak desert surroundings.

Ka‘u Desert Warrior Footprints on the Big Island

The 1.6-mile round-trip trek across this small section of the Ka’u Desert outside Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park is fascinating, and the history of the footprints makes the experience more evocative. Because of deterioration, the footprints are faint and difficult to make out, but worth the trip to see for yourself.

A cyclist on the last leg of the 2007 Ironman in Kona.

Hiking and Biking in Kona

Hiking and biking in Kona are two vastly different experiences. There are a lot of moderate trails that are almost always the means to getting to some awesome beach, but as home to the famous Ironman World Championship, Kona takes biking seriously.

The Waikamoi Ridge Trail takes you just far away enough from the road that the only sound you can hear is the call of native birds and the creak of bamboo as it sways in the wind above you.

Hiking Maui: Hana and Vicinity

Hiking in Hana consists of calm, easy trails, most of which are a nice short break to stretch your legs or a moderate workout. There are a few trails less traveled with rewards such as peaceful picnic areas or pristine waterfalls, and plenty of costal views.

Bathed in the scent of eucalyptus and pine, the “topside” of central Moloka‘i is where you truly feel as if you’re in the mountains.

Moloka‘i’s Hiking Trails

Even for Maui locals, the hiking trails of Moloka‘i are shrouded in mystery. Often the trails require either four-wheel drive access or permission from private landowners, although there are still a number that are accessible to the public. You’re rewarded for your effort with sweeping views of the entire island.

The Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail system stretches over half the island.

Following the King’s Trail in Kohala

A conglomeration of several trails, the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail system stretches over half the island. The National Park Service is working on improving the usability of these trails even more, but for now, there is about a 15-mile section that one can easily follow, with various access points depending on how long you wish to explore.

A large sea stack off the coast of Lanai.

Lana‘i Hiking Trails

Lana’i has plenty of hiking trails and most have something extra to offer such as unique archaeological sights or a bit of island history. The trails tend toward rugged, and there are a few that require planning ahead unless you’re eager for a challenging return trip.

A waterfall with a large cavern behind it at Twin Falls in East Maui.

Twin Falls Hiking Trail in East Maui

Twin Falls is one of the easiest and shortest waterfall hikes you’ll find in East Maui. Although there are myriad waterfalls here, the two main ones are most accessible for visitors. Here are detailed directions to both, advice for going further along the trail, and a few area tips.

Inside the dense bamboo forest of East Maui.

Hiking in the Bamboo Forest of East Maui

This challenging hike through Maui’s bamboo forest isn’t for everyone: there are steep slopes, deep forests, and even streams to traverse, but those who manage to find and stick to the trail are well-rewarded by the experience and the waterfalls of Na‘ili‘ili haele (bamboo forest)!