The 1956 edition of The Green Book. Photo © Candacy Taylor.

Route 66 and the Negro Motorist Green Book

During Route 66’s peak, sundown towns made life hard for black travelers. The Negro Motorist Green Book aimed to make travel easier by listing black-friendly establishments. Here are the best remaining Green Book properties on Route 66.

Robinson Point Light. Photo © Hilary and Tom Nangle.

Acadia’s Regional Lighthouses

The best known of the Acadia region’s coastal beacons is Bass Harbor Head Light, accessible to the public during daylight hours. Here are the other still-operating lighthouses in the Acadia region. All are automated; most are accessible only by boat. Sadly, none of the light towers are accessible to the public, but most of the grounds and some nearby buildings are.

Catedral Santiago de los Caballeros. Photo © Dreamstime.

Sights in Managua

You can easily visit all of Managua’s main attractions, which are scattered along the Avenida Bolívar, in half a day. Many are ruins and monuments to the disastrous 1972 earthquake that leveled the city, others are simply lovely places to sit and take in the city views. Expert author Elizabeth Perkins is here with a guided tour.

The garden at Casa Popenoe in Antigua. Photo © Lgalvarado (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Antigua’s Museums

Awash with history, Antigua is home to a handful of museums well worth making time for between your explorations of the city and the surrounding landscape. Displays range from arts and sculptures to religious artifacts to wonderfully restored 17th century architecture.

Catedral Metropolitana in San Salvador. Photo © Milosk50/Dreamstime.

San Salvador, El Salvador’s Urban Heart

Chaotic, congested, and consistently noisy, San Salvador is El Salvador’s capital and resilient urban heart. Battle hardened by civil unrest and natural disasters, the city bears the scars of its past with a fierce determination to create a better future, and it seems that perhaps finally, the tide is turning. It’s an exciting time of transition, and as a visitor, there is much to see and do. In fact, San Salvador can be the perfect base for your travels, with all of the comforts and amenities you need and many of the country’s top sights within a short bus ride away

Museo del Cemí is devoted to artifacts of the Taíno Indians. Photo © Suzanne Van Atten.

Mountain Scenery and Taíno Culture in Jayuya, Puerto Rico

If you visit only one place in Puerto Rico’s Cordillera Central, go to Jayuya. Go to experience the gorgeous mountain scenery and some of the highest peaks on the island, where it’s possible to see both the Atlantic and the Caribbean, as well as vegetation thick with sierra palms, bamboo, banana trees, and brilliantly colorful impatiens. This is also the place to soak up the rich Taíno culture and explore other historic sights.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Photo © Lpkb/Dreamstime.

A Guided Tour of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site

Almost a million people make the pilgrimage to Atlanta each year to pay tribute to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Since 1980, the National Park Service has maintained the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, which includes the graves of King and his wife, the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, the King Birth Home, and Historic Fire Station No. 6.

Sunner Time by artist Nellie Mae Rowe. Photo © Nellie Mae Rowe [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

African American Arts and Heritage in Atlanta

Atlanta has been called “the crown jewel in the story of black America” for good reason. The city’s distinction as a crossroads for equal opportunity dates back generations, due in no small part to the concentration of historically black colleges (the largest in the country) and long legacy of African American entrepreneurship and innovation. This unique heritage is also a major draw for tourism; no matter what the calendar says, it’s always Black History Month in Atlanta.