Even if they’ve never set foot on the island of Bermuda, most everyone knows that the archipelago lies in the maw of a spooky phenomenon dubbed the “Bermuda Triangle”.

The Bermuda Triangle

If there’s one thing most everyone knows about Bermuda—even if they’ve never set foot on the island—it’s the Bermuda Triangle. Surprisingly, Bermuda has never made much of the legend, even as a potential tourist attraction.

The predominant foliage in Volcanoes National Park is ‘ohi‘a, which contrasts with the bleak desert surroundings.

Ka‘u Desert Warrior Footprints on the Big Island

The 1.6-mile round-trip trek across this small section of the Ka‘u Desert outside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is fascinating, and the history of the footprints makes the experience more evocative. Because of deterioration, the footprints are faint and difficult to make out, but worth the trip to see for yourself.

Watercolor painting by Winslow Homer of Bermuda's coast.

The Birdsey Studio and Other Bermuda Artists

Scores of artists made their way to Bermuda in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, with many finding fresh energy to paint and draw. Learn about their time in Bermuda, their works, and contemporary painter Jo Birdsey-Linberg, daughter of painter Alfred Birdsey, whose studio remains open to the public.

A Hawaiian cowboy (paniolo) astride a horse throwing a rope.

Paniolo: Hawaiian Cowboys

Learn the fascinating story of Hawaiian cowboys, the paniolo, from the origin of their name, their Mexican roots, to how the tradition continues today. At various ranches across Hawaii, visitors can take part in rides, events, and festivities.

Close up of white-petaled naupaka flowers in the Oahu mountains.

Pele Legends in Hawaii

Pele, the goddess of fire, features in many Hawaiian legends, most of which showcase her fiery nature. Here are two, one to explain the curious appearance of certain flowers, and another a cautionary tale about the consequences of stealing her lava rocks.

Eucalyptus trees forming a natural tunnel near Koloa Kauai.

Sightseeing in Koloa, Kaua‘i

Many of the sights on the Hawaiian Islands are a combination of history and beauty, and the same holds true for sightseeing in Koloa, Kaua‘i. Two of Koloa’s main sights to see give visitors a deeper understanding of the town’s heritage, which in turn deepens appreciation of wandering its lovely landscapes.

The colorful rocky landscape of Keahiakawelo on Lanai.

Natural and Cultural Sights on Lana‘i

From cultural sights such as ancient petroglyphs and heiau, and an abandoned plantation village, to Hawaii’s last dryland forest and a naturally-occurring moonscape, sightseeing on Lana‘i can be a quick browse of each or a leisurely immersion.