Fishing in Glacier National Park

With 27,023 acres of lakes, 563 streams, and 22 species of fish, Glacier is a place where no angler should sit with a slack line. Only a scant 10 percent of park visitors fish, so those who do typically enjoy calm vistas and a few native trout. Here are a few tips to successfully conquer Glacier’s waters.

Wildlife Watching in Glacier: Tips and Hot Spots

With 60 mammal species and more than 260 species of birds, wildlife watchers keep busy in Glacier. Here are the best spots to see everything from grizzly bears to mountain goats, as well as advice to make sure you get the best views and photographs while always staying safe.

Planning Your Trip to Glacier National Park

There’s plenty to see and do in Glacier National Park, whether you’re going to be there for a few days or a few weeks. Here’s a list of the must-see sights, as well as advice on when to go.

Get Up Close and Personal with Glaciers

Sadly, Glacier National Park’s namesake glaciers are expected to melt away completely within the next 8-18 years. Check out these six must-see glaciers up close while you still can.

Glacier National Park: The Crown of the Continent

Glacier National Park is the undisputed “Crown of the Continent.” Its glaciers acsend steep arêtes where mountain goats walk like acrobats. Acres of lush green parkland plunge down jagged red pinnacles, exposing some of the world’s oldest stones. Waterfalls roar, ice cracks, and rockfall echoes in scenery still under the paintbrush of change.

Moon Glacier National Park

Writer, editor, and avid outdoorswoman Becky Lomax offers an insider’s perspective on Glacier National Park, where she once worked shredding lettuce in the kitchen so she could hike the park’s nearly 300 miles of park trails during her free time. From hiking through multi-color meadows filled with wildflowers to observing the Sperry Glacier, a victim […]

Sights, Accommodations, and Camping along I-90 in Northwestern Montana

Forest-rimmed, hilly, and as wild as an interstate ever gets, I-90 follows the Clark Fork and St. Regis Rivers most of the way between the Idaho border and Missoula. From the state line east to Frenchtown, just west of Missoula, I-90 follows the Mullan Road, built by John Mullan and his crew in the 1860s as a military road from Fort Benton to Walla Walla, Washington.