A spout of water erupts through the rock on Maui's western coast.

Off the Beaten Track: Maui’s Northwestern Coast

Sightseeing along Maui’s northwestern coast is a delight for anyone interested in a little of this and a little of that. There’s a scenic drive (not for the timid with its narrow, curving roads), natural wonders that go from the actively awe-inspiring to the serene, and of course, a good dose of local culture and history.

A mural of a train station at the Laupahoehoe Train Museum on the Big Island.

Sights on the Hamakua Coast of Hawai‘i

Sightseeing on the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island is a nice mix with a few places to simply relax and enjoy the island, a bit of history and culture, the usual beach activities, and a few surprises like zip lining above beautiful gardens (that you can also explore on foot).

The Alakoko Fishpond tells the story of Hawaiian history and myths.

Sightseeing in Lihu‘e, Kaua‘i

While Lihu‘e certainly has some amazing sights to see, such as a beautifully preserved plantation and truly inspiring museum architecture, the stories behind the sights make them worth the time to fully experience.

A pandanus palm at the Arboretum. Photo © Malcolm Manners, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

On the Wild Side: Bermuda’s Nature Reserves

Bermuda may seem like a manicured garden, but many parishes maintain national parks and nature reserves perfect for travelers interested in seeing Bermuda’s wilder side. Often these parks and reserves are excellent hiking and bird-watching spots as well.

One of Diego Rivera’s most entertaining works is housed in the Museo Mural Diego Rivera, a small museum dedicated entirely to that piece.

Public Murals in Mexico City

Murals abound in Mexio City, many of them painted by masters of the medium such as Diego Rivera. If you’d like to see the best of the best, make sure you visit these marvels on your next visit to Mexico City.

The neon lit front of the retro Blue Swallow Motel along Route 66.

Exploring the Spirit of Route 66 in New Mexico

Though officially decommissioned, Route 66 (now traced by I-40) is still alive in New Mexico in the form of neon signs and cruising culture. Hit the road, preferably in a convertible, and check out these retro sights.

Apache Crown Dancers performing at the 92nd Inter-Tribal Ceremonial in Gallup,NM.

Native American New Mexico, Ancient and Modern

Even if you’re visiting only a small area on your trip, there’s a lot of American Indian history to see in and around each place in New Mexico—but definitely try to schedule a visit around a dance ceremony at a pueblo, as this will give you the most memorable impression of the living culture.