Paradise Cave is one of the few sights in the park that can be visited independently. Photo © Dana Filek-Gibson.

The Caves of Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park

A labyrinth of subterranean tunnels and jaw-dropping, otherworldly landscapes, Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park may be off the beaten path for now, but its anonymity is fading fast. Decked out in eerie, alien rock formations and spindly stalactites, these tunnels are estimated at around 3-5 million years old. Here you’ll find the world’s largest cave, home to a thunderous river, clouds, and an entire jungle ecosystem.

Diving at the RMS Rhone National Park wreck site. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Salt Island and the Wreck of the RMS Rhone

Many islands in the Virgins have salt ponds where crystal salt was collected, but no island had a larger or more productive pond than Salt Island. It’s also home to the wreck of the RMS Rhone, the preeminent dive site in the British Virgin Islands and one of its most visited attractions. Learn about the island’s history and how to thoroughly explore the Rhone’s remains.

A howler monkey at the Community Baboon Sanctuary. Photo © Lebawit Lily Girma.

The Best Wildlife Spotting in the Belize Cayes

Filled with national parks and wildlife reserves, Belize home to an estimated 145 species of mammals, 139 species of reptiles, and at least 500 species of birds, many of which can be spotted along the cayes. An island vacation doesn’t mean missing out on any of the wildlife—here is what to look out for both inland and offshore.

Trunk Bay is the most exquisite beach on St. John. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Trunk Bay: St. John’s Most Magnificent Beach

Trunk Bay is a vision of fluffy white sand, sea grape trees, and coconut palms. Trunk Cay, just offshore, is a tiny island of rocky cliffs, tufted by hardy palm trees. Named for the leatherback turtles, locally called trunks, which nest here, and fully equipped with facilities, this is what Caribbean beach dreams are made of.

Visitors gazing into the main the crater of Poás Volcano.

Poás Volcano National Park, Costa Rica

There are few volcanoes where you can drive all the way to the rim. At Costa Rica’s Parque Nacional Volcán Poás you can—well, at least to within 300 meters (1,000 feet), where a short stroll puts you at the very edge of one of the world’s largest active craters. Learn about this restless giant’s history, along with trip planning tips to make the most of your visit.

Parque Nacional Natural Utría on the Pacific coast of Colombia. Photo © Andrew Dier.

Plan a Visit to Colombia’s Parque Nacional Natural Utría

Colombia’s Parque Nacional Natural Utría has a spectacular location on the edge of the jungle but close to some great beaches. The best way to experience the park is to stay in one of its cabins during the week, allowing you unfettered access to all the guided nature walks, kayaking, snorkeling and more, as well as immersing yourself completely in this beautiful landscape.

A boulder at the Baths National Park. Photo © Todd VanSickle.

Experience Baths National Park, BVI

Virgin Gorda’s Baths National Park is one of the most famous sights in the British Virgin Islands. The Baths are a landscape of building-size boulders, clear saltwater grottoes, and powder-white beaches. There are endless pools for exploring, swimming, and snorkeling. The park is a playground, where even grown-ups are tempted to climb over and around, looking for a quiet pool or hidden room.

Suspension bridge at Mayflower Bocawina National Park. Photo © Lebawit Lily Girma.

Planning a Visit to Mayflower Bocawina National Park

Mayflower Bocawina National Park in the Belize Cayes comprises more than 7,100 acres of Maya Mountain wilderness set aside to protect and showcase the area’s five waterfalls and green-fringed Mayan ruins. A trail system offers excellent independent hiking with guides and tours offered to enhance the experience, and plenty of other adventures.

Giant elephant ears at Sage Mountain National Park. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Hiking Sage Mountain National Park

Sage Mountain National Park, a 92-acre park in west-central Tortola, is home to scenic overlooks, a forest untouched for over 500 years, and a host of delightful tropical trees, flowers, and animals. Hikers will enjoy cool air, dozens of signs that identify trees and plants along the trails, and climbing to the highest point in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands.