Petroglyph National Monument in New Mexico.

Albuquerque’s Petroglyph National Monument

Albuquerque’s west side is bordered by Petroglyph National Monument, 7,500 acres of black boulders that crawl with some 20,000 carved lizards, birds, and assorted other beasts. Learn about the area’s history and how to make of the most of your visit to the monument with drives, hikes, and views.

Stenciled hands in various shades of oranges and red paint on a cave wall.

Argentina’s Cueva de las Manos (the Cave of Hands)

The Cueva de las Manos is a UNESCO World Heritage Site where stencils of hundreds of human hands, guanacos, and abstract forms cover the walls in orange, red, and yellow tones. The oldest date from around 7370 b.c. and represent hunter-gatherers from immediate postglacial times.

The colorful rocky landscape of Keahiakawelo on Lanai.

Natural and Cultural Sights on Lana‘i

From cultural sights such as ancient petroglyphs and heiau, and an abandoned plantation village, to Hawaii’s last dryland forest and a naturally-occurring moonscape, sightseeing on Lana‘i can be a quick browse of each or a leisurely immersion.

Petroglyphs marked on exposed granite.

Phoenix Day Hike: Waterfall Trail

Wheelchair-accessible and kid-friendly, the Waterfall Trail is just filled with delights. The graded-dirt portion includes educational plaques with details about surrounding plants, animals (bobcats, ringtails, bats, and hawks), and petroglyphs.

Flat and squarish stones piled to make a keyhole with a view of the canyons beyond.

The 10-Day Best of Utah’s National Parks

Despite their proximity, visiting all of Utah’s national parks is a bit complicated because of the rugged terrain, so you must plan on a lot of driving. The following itinerary only scratches the surface of what there is to see, but after this sampler, you’ll know where to focus your next Utah adventure.