The Wupatki National Monument. Photo © Tim Hull.

Who Were the Sinagua and Where Did They Go?

The Sinagua left their architecture and masonry all over north-central Arizona, but little else. Here’s what we know of them today, pieced together from artifacts, ruins, and geology.

Three Sisters Hoodoos in Goblin Valley State Park. Photo © William Perry/123rf.

Explore Utah’s Southeastern Corner

Utah’s southeastern corner contains an incredible wealth of scenic and culturally significant sites. Consider rounding out your trip to this part of Utah with a tour of Ancestral Puebloan ruins, remote desert washes, soaring natural bridges, snowy mountain peaks, and a vast reservoir.

Ruins at Joya de Ceren. Photo © Jaime Jacques.

Day Trips from San Salvador

Two day trips in the vicinity of San Salvador stand out: the unique ruins of Joya del Cerén and exploring the suburb of Santa Tecla. It’s easy to spend a few days in Santa Tecla if you have the time, but if you stop by only for a day, definitely aim for the weekend to hit Paseo El Carmen for the street fair.

San Andrés Ruins. Photo © Raúl Arias, licensed Creative Commons usage.

The Indigenous History of Panchimalco and the San Andres Ruins

The area surrounding San Salvador is rich with history and natural beauty. If you are in the area, it is definitely worth making a short drive (or bus ride) to explore the wonderful sights of Panchimalco and San Andrés Ruins and learn more about the indigenous people of El Salvador.

Mayan glyphs. Photo © Al Argueta.

Lost and Found: The Mystery of Guatemala’s Site Q

For much of the 20th century, looters worked Petén’s remote sites undisturbed, raiding tombs and extracting precious artifacts before archaeologists had a chance to study and document them. At the height of the looting, in the 1960s, archaeologists marveled at a series of magnificent glyphs making their way into a number of private collections and museums from an unknown site. Archaeologists dubbed the pieces’ origin “Site Q” and the search to find the mysterious producer of the wonderful glyphs was on.

Temple I at sunrise. Photo © Al Argueta.

Explore the Ruins of Tikal

There is plenty to explore in this vast Mayan city that once harbored thousands of people, and you could easily spend several days here taking it all in. The ruins in evidence today are representative of the latter years of Tikal’s existence, as the Maya built on top of existing temples and palaces.

Monumento al Indio. Photo © Suzanne Van Atten.

Sights in Isabela, Puerto Rico

The area known today as Isabela was once ruled by Cacique Mabodamaca, one of the island’s most powerful Taíno chiefs. The town of Isabela features a charming little plaza anchored by a church, as are all town plazas, impressive cultural sights, ruins, and one of the most hair-raising mountain drives.

Surfers in action at Sayulita beach. Photo © Justin Henderson.

Discover Sayulita and the Riviera Nayarit

Once upon a time, not so many people made the effort to see what lies north of Puerto Vallarta along the beautiful and verdant Nayarit Coast. This has changed of late, however, as the “Riviera Nayarit” has emerged as a major tourist destination in Mexico. Whether you are looking for a quiet respite from the crowded streets and beaches of Puerto Vallarta or a nonstop beach party with hundreds of potential new friends, there’s a place for you just a couple of hours away.

San Gervasio. Photo © Juris Didrihsons/123rf.

Maya Archeaological Sites on Isla Cozumel

Isla Cozumel played a deeply significant role in the Maya world. The island’s primary site—known as San Gervasio today—was dedicated to Ixchel, the Maya goddess of fertility, the moon, childbirth, medicine, and weaving. Read on to discover more about archaeological sites on the island.

Puerto Ferro Berdiales Lighthouse Ruins Archeological Site. Photo © Michael Hopkins/123rf.

Sights on Vieques, Puerto Rico

From the overgrown ruins of a sugar mill to a restored 19th century Spanish fort to an incredible bioluminescent bay, there’s plenty to see on Vieques–and most you can do for free. Here are the most interesting sights to see, along with the island’s best beaches for a break between all the activity.