Natural Bridge in Bryce Canyon Natural Park. Photo © Paul Brady/123rf.

Visiting Bryce, Zion, and the Grand Canyon in Winter

Grand Canyon National Park, Zion National Park, and Bryce Canyon National Park–three incredible bucket-list-parks–remain largely summer destinations. But when temperatures plummet, these otherwise busy parks are perfect for those who seek solitude and tranquility.

Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. Photo © Ann Marie Brown.

Sights Near Glacier Point in Yosemite

Often referred to as “the grandest view in all the West,” Glacier Point is a 7,214-foot overlook with a vista of Yosemite Valley, Half Dome and all its granite neighbors, and the High Sierra. Nearby are other amazing–and often overlooked–vistas, along with the Badger Pass Ski Area. Badger Pass is the oldest ski resort in California, great for playing in the snow or simply stopping for lunch on a sunny day.

Neah Bay. Photo © Tim Gohrke/123rf.

One-Week Itinerary: Best of the Olympic Peninsula

One of the best parts about the Olympic Peninsula is that you don’t need to stray far from its main thoroughfare, Highway 101, to experience a good number of area highlights. Highway 101 travels around the perimeter of the peninsula and Olympic National Park, making it possible to see the best the area has to offer in a limited amount of time.

Natural Bridge in Bryce Canyon. Photo © Judy Jewell.

Scenic Drive in Bryce Canyon National Park

From elevations of about 8,000 feet near the visitors center, Bryce Canyon National Park’s scenic drive gradually winds 1,100 feet higher to Rainbow Point. On a clear day, you can enjoy vistas of more than 100 miles from many of the viewpoints. Visitors wishing to see all of the viewpoints should take a walk on the Rim Trail.

Volcán Telica. Photo © lanabyko/123rf.

Hiking Nicaragua’s Maribio Volcanoes

Each volcano along the Maribio chain is unique and offers a different sort of adventure from the quintessential cone-shaped volcano, Momotombo, to the most frequently active volcano in the chain, Cerro Negro. Start early for each of these and bring a minimum of three liters of water per person. None of these hikes should be attempted without a guide, but luckily you won’t have any trouble finding a local one. Community tourism projects are growing at the base of many of these volcanoes.