Ridley turtles during an arribada at Playa Camaronal. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Sea Turtle Nesting Sites in Costa Rica

Five of the world’s seven species of marine turtles nest on Costa Rica’s beaches, and you can see turtles laying eggs somewhere in Costa Rica virtually any time of year. Most of the important nesting sites in Costa Rica are now protected, and access to some is restricted; there are many more dangers to sea turtle populations than humans. Learn about the sites and the cycle of sea turtle reproduction from nesting to hatching.

Red-eyed tree frog at Parque Reptilandia. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Things to Do in and Around Dominical

Dominical is a tiny laid-back resort favored by surfers, backpackers, and the college-age crowd. The beach is beautiful albeit pebbly, and the warm waters attract whales and dolphins close to shore. If you overdose on the sun, sand, and surf, head into the lush mountains inland of Dominicalito or head east on a paved road that leads to San Isidro, winding up through the valley of the Río Barú into the Fila Costanera mountains, where you may find yourself amid swirling clouds.

Blue Ctenosaur in Santa Rosa National Park. Photo © Jorasm (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

What to See in Costa Rica’s Santa Rosa National Park

Founded in 1972, Santa Rosa National Park was Costa Rica’s first national park. The park–divided into two sections; the more important and accessible Santa Rosa Sector to the south and the Murciélago Sector further north–is a mosaic of 10 distinct habitats, including mangrove swamp, savanna, and oak forest, and is filled with hiking trails to explore and wildlife to watch. There are also great opportunities for scuba diving and surfing.

A baby sea turtle in Monterrico. Photo © Al Argueta.

Visiting Monterrico and Parque Hawaii, Guatemala

Monterrico, once a sleepy fishing village, has become a popular weekend destination for Guatemala City residents as well as for foreigners looking to spend some time on the beach during their stay. Along with Parque Hawaii, visitors have the opportunity to interact with nature in some unique ways, whether it’s touring the mangrove canals or holding a baby sea turtle in your hand before its maiden voyage out to sea.

A Hawaaian sea urchin in a coral crevice.

Ocean Safety in Hawaii

More people drown in Hawaii than anywhere else in the world. But don’t let the statistics deter you from enjoying the ocean! Use common sense along with these tips for respecting both the ocean and the creatures that live in it to stay safe.

Waves roll in over a flat expanse of beach at dusk.

Seeing the Turtles at Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas

Costa Rican beaches don’t come more beautiful than Playa Grande, a seemingly endless curve of sand, varying from coral-white to gray, immediately north of Tamarindo. Exploring Parque Nacional Marino Las Baulas is well worth it since leatherback turtles visit this beach all year round.

The sun shines on a sea turtle resting on the sand of Makalawena beach.

The Best North Kona Beaches

Many of the best Kona beaches require some work to get to, and the walk over uneven lava can be difficult for some. There are equal amounts of beaches that don’t require any walking beyond from the parking lot to the sand, so feel free to out of the beaches that require more effort to get to.