Avenue of the Giants. Photo © Suppavut Varutbangkul/123rf.

Explore Humboldt Redwoods State Park

Surprisingly, the largest stand of unlogged redwood trees isn’t on the coast, and it isn’t in the Sierras; it’s here in Humboldt, bisected by U.S. 101. Come to this park to hike and camp beneath the 300-foot-plus old-growth trees of the Avenue of the Giants, and cool off with a swim or boat trip down the Eel River.

A shipwreck on the beach near Fort Stevens State Park. Photo © Peter Iredale/Dreamstime.

One Week in Coastal Oregon’s State Parks

Coastal Oregon has a large number of high-quality state parks. Parks are located at all of the coast’s most beautiful places, making access easy and affordable. Each of these itineraries makes for a great weekend trip, or you could combine them for a weeklong adventure.

Samuel H. Boardman Scenic Corridor. Photo © Strekoza2/Dreamstime.

Top 10 Photo Ops on the Oregon Coast

The Oregon coast is so photogenic that both professional and amateur photographers vie for the best shots, which, given coastal conditions, can be challenging. While there are stunning vistas around nearly every corner, here are some can’t-miss photo opportunities and tips for making the most of cloudy or foggy days.

Fall foliage highlights water cascading over Upper Tahquamenon Falls.

Tahquamenon Falls State Park, Michigan

Tahquamenon Falls State Park is home to one of the country’s largest waterfalls, as well as the pleasant cascade of the Lower Falls. Both are very easy to visit. Here’s a brief overview of the park along with directions to prime viewing locations.

View of Kauai's coast from the Kalalau Trail.

Na Pali Coast State Park, Kaua‘i

Nature’s wonders all join together in the heavenly and harsh Na Pali Coast State Park. Day-use permits are required past a certain point even if you’re not staying overnight, while camping is strictly regulated. Most areas are accessible only by foot or boat, and more than the basics are needed to camp out here.