Arenal Volcano stands tall in the Northern Zone of Costa Rica. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Where to Go in Costa Rica

To relax, unwind, and adventure, Costa Rica truly offers something for everyone. From the thriving nightlife of San José, to the crisp, cool cloud forests of Monteverde to the white-sand beaches of the Nicoya Peninsula, here’s where to go in Costa Rica.

Rio Aluminé flows past rocky hillsides covered with pine trees.

Visit Junín de los Andes in Northern Patagonia

Styling itself Neuquén’s “trout capital,” Junín also provides the best access to the central sector of Parque Nacional Lanín, which takes its name from the symmetrical cone along the Chilean border. Here are the sights to see and things to do–heavy on sports and recreation–and trip planning tips.

A small river runs in the foreground while the near perfect triangle silhouette of Mount Arenal rises in the distance.

Visit Parque Nacional Volcán Arenal, Costa Rica

Inside Parque Nacional Volcán Arenal is Costa Rica’s most active volcano and a must-see on any tourist’s itinerary. Hiking here is incredible, but heed the warning signs—while your chances of seeing an eruption are slim, the volcano is totally unpredictable.

Leleiwi Overlook on Haleakala.

Best Hikes in Haleakala National Park

If you’re an outdoors enthusiast, no trip to Maui is complete without tackling at least one of Haleakala’s trails. With that thought in mind, here’s a rundown of the most popular hikes, listed from shortest to longest.

Parque Nacional Conguillío, Chile.

Visit Parque Nacional Conguillío in the Chilean Lakes District

Directly east of Temuco, 3,125-meter Volcán Llaima’s smoldering crater is Conguillío’s most eye-catching feature. Since colonial times, Chile’s second most active volcano has recorded dozens of violent eruptions. Plan a visit to this UNESCO biosphere reserve that abounds with dozens of other lava flows, secondary cones, alpine lakes, river canyons, and the Araucaria forest that it was created to protect.

The predominant foliage in Volcanoes National Park is ‘ohi‘a, which contrasts with the bleak desert surroundings.

Ka‘u Desert Warrior Footprints on the Big Island

The 1.6-mile round-trip trek across this small section of the Ka‘u Desert outside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is fascinating, and the history of the footprints makes the experience more evocative. Because of deterioration, the footprints are faint and difficult to make out, but worth the trip to see for yourself.