While a visit to Northern California’s famous redwoods should definitely be on every traveler’s list, don’t forget to take a look at the numerous oaks and the blankets of California poppies that grow just about everywhere.

Redwoods

The coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) grows along the North Coast as far south as Big Sur. Coast redwoods are characterized by their towering height, flaky red bark, and moist understory. Among the tallest trees on earth, they are also some of the oldest, with some individuals almost 2,000 years old. Coast redwoods occupy a narrow strip of coastal California, growing less than 50 miles inland to collect moisture from the ocean and fog. Their tannin-rich bark is crucial to their ability to survive wildfires and regenerate afterward. The best places to marvel at the giants are within the Redwood National and State Parks, Muir Woods, and Big Basin State Park.

Giant coastal redwoods at the Jedidiah Smith State Park. Photo © Sekarb/Dreamstime.

Giant coastal redwoods at the Jedidiah Smith State Park. Photo © Sekarb/Dreamstime.

Coast redwoods occupy a narrow strip of coastal California, growing less than 50 miles inland to collect moisture from the ocean and fog.The giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) grows farther inland in a 260-mile belt at 2,700-8,900 feet elevation in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Giant sequoias are the largest trees by volume on earth; they can grow to heights of 280 feet with a diameter up to 26 feet and can live for thousands of years. Giant sequoias share the ruddy bark of the coast sequoia as well as its fire-resistant qualities. The best places to see giant sequoias up close are at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Calaveras Big Trees, and the Mariposa Grove at Yosemite National Park.

Oaks

Northern California is home to many native oaks. The most common are the valley oak, black oak, live oak, and coastal live oak. The deciduous valley oak (Quercus lobata) commonly grows on slopes, valleys, and wooded foothills in the Central Valley. The black oak, also deciduous, grows throughout the foothills of the Coast Range and Sierra Nevada; it is unfortunately one of the victims of sudden oak death. The live oak habitat is in the Central Valley, and the coastal live oak occupies the Coast Range. The acorns of all these oaks were an important food supply for California’s Native American population and continue to be an important food source for wildlife.

Wildflowers

California’s state flower is the California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). The pretty little perennial grows just about everywhere, even on the sides of the busiest highways. The flowers of most California poppies are bright orange, but they also appear occasionally in white, cream, and an even deeper red-orange.

California Poppies. Photo © Biolifepics/Dreamstime.

California Poppies. Photo © Biolifepics/Dreamstime.


Excerpted from the Seventh Edition of Moon Northern California.