Norway is increasing in popularity as a cruise destination, perhaps because the country’s Hurtigruten cruise ships offer a much more intimate home-grown cruising experience.

The fleet of 13 Hurtigruten ships travel the length of the Norwegian coastline from Bergen to Kirkenes by the Russian border. In a tradition stretching back to 1893, the ships call at big cities and tiny remote communities, delivering goods and providing a vital transport link to local residents.

Hurtigruten cruse ship sits in the water of Geirangerfjord

The Hurtigruten ferry cruises through stunning scenery, include Geirangerfjord (shown here). Photo © Borlili/Dreamstime.com.

Unlike luxury cruise liners, the Hurtigruten ships are working ships with basic yet comfortable facilities for travelers. There’s no black tie required for dinner. Passage can also be booked between any two points on the route, combining a mini-cruise with an excellent transportation option between cities such as Bergen, Ålesund, and Trondheim for those without a car.

Highlights of the full 13-day round-trip cruise from Bergen to Kirkenes include:

  • An opportunity to see the northern lights (fall through spring) away from the light pollution of built-up areas.
  • Local seasonal menus devised based on the ingredients picked up at ports along the route.
  • A unique perspective on the dramatic Lofoten islands and parts of Arctic Norway that few other travelers get to see.
  • Walking tours around the thriving cities of Bergen, Ålesund, Trondheim, and Tromsø, interspersed with relaxing sailings down the world-famous Geirangerfjord (summer only) and Trollfjord.

Get more information and tickets at www.hurtigruten.com.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Norway.