Diving | Moon Travel Guides https://moon.com Trip Ideas, Itineraries, Maps & Area Experts Wed, 22 Nov 2017 23:51:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9 https://deathstar-650a.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/cropped-moon_logo_M-32x32.jpg Diving | Moon Travel Guides https://moon.com 32 32 125073523 Cabo Pulmo Diving and Snorkeling https://moon.com/2017/11/cabo-pulmo-diving-and-snorkeling/ https://moon.com/2017/11/cabo-pulmo-diving-and-snorkeling/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 00:02:19 +0000 https://moon.com/?p=60538 With a reef that begins just a few meters off the shore, Cabo Pulmo is an extremely appealing dive and snorkel spot. Here's a quick look at its beaches and outfitters.

The post Cabo Pulmo Diving and Snorkeling appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
One of only three coral reefs in North America, the Cabo Pulmo reef is 5,000 years old and the only living coral reef in the Sea of Cortez. The marine reserve was established in 1995 to protect the reef, and in 2005, UNESCO recognized it as a World Heritage Site. There are eight separate fingers of the reef, four close to shore and the other four out in the bay. The reef begins just a few meters off the shore, which makes Cabo Pulmo an extremely appealing diving and snorkeling spot. Commercial and sportfishing are banned within the park.

The waters here are teeming with marine life, and divers and snorkelers have the ability to see sea turtles, dolphin, parrot fish, angelfish, damselfish, mobula rays, sharks, and whales. Large schools of tropical fish provide impressive sights for those who explore this part of the Sea of Cortez.

The little town of Cabo Pulmo is completely off the grid. The rustic, dusty town is inhabited by a small group of Mexicans and expats who operate the dive shops, accommodations, and restaurants in town. There are not many services here (no ATMS or gas stations) and just a handful of small lodging options and restaurants. Travelers who visit are usually divers or those looking for a remote and peaceful escape.

a diver under water looking at fish and coral in the Sea of Cortez

The Cabo Pulmo reef is 5,000 years old and the only living coral reef in the Sea of Cortez. Photo © Hoatzinexp/iStock.

Cabo Pulmo Beaches

Los Arbolitos

Five kilometers south of town, Los Arbolitos is the best beach in the area for snorkeling. There aren’t many services out here, so if you don’t have your own snorkel and mask, you’ll need to rent one in town before coming out to Los Arbolitos. There are primitive bathroom and shower facilities. You’ll need to pay US$2 to park your car and for access to the facilities.

Playa La Sirenita

Also known as Dinosaur Egg Beach or Los Chopitos, this beach is difficult to access. Playa La Sirenita can only be reached by kayak, boat, or from a walking path from Los Arbolitos. The attractive narrow beach has white sand speckled by rocks. Hidden at the base of a cliff, the beach has protected waters that provide an excellent area for snorkeling around the rocks just offshore.

Los Frailes

When the winds kick up in the afternoons, divers and snorkelers head to Bahía de Los Frailes. Nine kilometers south of Bahía Cabo Pulmo, this sheltered bay provides a calm location for diving. The long beach has a few palapas for shade, but otherwise very few services. Snorkeling and diving take place at the northern part of the beach where the rocky point is. Camping is allowed, and this is a popular spot for dry camping and RVers.

palapas on the beach at Los Arbolitos in Cabo Pulmo

Visit Los Arbolitos for the best snorkeling, but make sure to bring gear with you, as there are few services offered here. Photo © Jennifer Kramer.

Snorkeling Cabo Pulmo

Because the coral reef begins just a few meters from the shoreline, it’s possible to snorkel directly from shore at Cabo Pulmo without having to take a boat out to reach the good spots. Los Arbolitos, about five kilometers south of town, is the prime spot for snorkeling off of the beach. If it’s too windy at Arbolitos, head down to the more protected Los Frailes where the snorkeling is good along the point on the north end of the beach.

If you want to go on an organized snorkeling trip, any of the tour operators that run dive trips can accommodate snorkeling trips as well. There are stands and information for tours in town where the beach access is (next to La Palapa restaurant). The tour operators can take you out on boats to certain beaches and spots that you can’t access on your own.

Snorkeling trips with Eco Adventures (tel. 624/157-4072, US$45-60) last 2.5 hours and include snorkeling equipment, waters, soft drinks, snacks, the national park entrance fee, and a guide. For those with younger kids, they offer a special device with a Plexiglas viewer that allows them to see underwater without using snorkeling gear.

diving tour boat on the ocean in Cabo Pulmo

A tour boat departing from the beach access in Cabo Pulmo. Photo © Jennifer Kramer.

Diving Cabo Pulmo

There’s good scuba diving year-round in Cabo Pulmo, but the best seasons are summer and fall when the visibility is best (30 meters or more) and water temperatures are warm. Divers can find themselves surrounded by large schools of fish like snappers, bigeye jacks, and porkfish. Moray eels, sea turtles, octopus, sharks and manta rays are also common sights. Guided drift diving is how most tours operate, with divers drifting along with the current and the captain following with the boat.

In the center of town, Cabo Pulmo Beach Resort (tel. 624/141-0726) is a PADI-certified dive center. They have well-maintained gear and professional and experienced guides who can handle beginning to advanced divers. They operate a hotel as well, so they offer complete packages including accommodations, food, and diving.

With a stand near the beach access in town, Cabo Pulmo Sport Center (tel. 624/157-9795) offers dive tours that start at US$95 for one dive. They also handle snorkeling tours, equipment rental, sportfishing, kayaking, and whale-watching. In case you want to video your underwater adventure, they also rent GoPros.

Cabo Pulmo Divers (tel. 612/157-3381) and Cabo Pulmo Watersports (tel. 624/176-2618) are two more options for dive operators.

Map of El Camino Rural Costero, Mexico

Map of El Camino Rural Costero

If you're headed to Los Cabos, Mexico, pay a visit to Cabo Pulmo National Park for excellent diving and snorkeling opportunities. Author Jennifer Kramer guides you to the best beaches and outfitters in the area so that you can experience the beautiful living reef in the Sea of Cortez.


Excerpted from the Tenth Edition of Moon Los Cabos.

The post Cabo Pulmo Diving and Snorkeling appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2017/11/cabo-pulmo-diving-and-snorkeling/feed/ 0 60538
Diving Thailand’s Coasts https://moon.com/2016/08/diving-thailands-coasts/ https://moon.com/2016/08/diving-thailands-coasts/#respond Wed, 24 Aug 2016 12:30:27 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=40983 The waters of Thailand offer an amazing diversity of marine life and dive sites from beginner to advanced, some considered among the best in the world.

The post Diving Thailand’s Coasts appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
The waters surrounding the Andaman coast and the Samui Archipelago offer an amazing diversity of marine life and dive sites from beginner to advanced, some considered among the best in the world. Along Thailand’s two coasts, hundreds of dive shops offer courses, equipment rental, day trips, and live-aboards. If you’re planning on diving in the region, don’t worry too much about where you are staying relative to the areas where you want to dive; most diving shops (especially in Phuket) offer dives to all of the most popular sites in the region.

Richelieu Rock is known to attract giant, gentle whale sharks.

Richelieu Rock is known to attract giant, gentle whale sharks. Photo © Piboon Srimak/123rf.

Diving in Phuket

  • Ko Racha Noi is a popular place to visit on a day trip and has a nice mix of both colorful coral and challenging, rocky terrain.
  • Another very popular destination is Shark Point, about 32 kilometers (20 mi) east of Chalong Bay. There are three rock outcroppings that attract sharks, including leopard sharks.
  • Just under one kilometer (0.6 mi) away from Shark Point is Anemone Reef, with lots of anemone, coral, and plenty of colorful small fish.
  • If you’re interested in wreck diving, close by is King Cruiser Wreck, a sunken car ferry in Phang Nga Bay. This site is appropriate for most divers and attracts lots of fish.

Diving the Andaman Coast

  • The waters surrounding Ko Phi Phi offer both nice diving and excellent snorkeling. The biggest attraction here is the colorful coral and vibrant fish. Most of the dives are not difficult, but divers looking for more of a challenge can check out the wall diving at Ao Nui.
  • South of Ko Lanta are some excellent (and convenient) dive sites. The Mu Ko Lanta National Park is a group of 15 small islands, many with good diving in surrounding areas. You’ll find lots of rocky terrain attracting colorful fish, some underwater caves to explore, and beautiful coral. The Ko Kradan Wreck is now an artificial reef.
  • The Ko Surin islands are part of the Mu Ko Surin National Park and are best known for the excellent coral surrounding them. The biggest draw is Richelieu Rock, a rock pinnacle jutting out of the ocean that’s known to attract giant, gentle whale sharks. These islands are accessible by live-aboard trips from Phuket, but if you’re staying in Khao Lak, you can visit on a day trip.
  • The Similan Islands are nine granite islands which make up the Mu Ko Similan National Park and are considered by most to offer the best diving in Thailand and some of the best diving in the world. Here you’ll find plenty of colorful reefs and plankton blooms attracting sharks, rays, and plenty of tropical fish. Other parts of the island grouping are more rugged, with boulder formations offering more adventurous diving. There are also great night-diving spots where you’ll see squid, crustaceans, and other creatures. These islands can be visited on day trips from Phuket and Khao Lak, but many people choose multiday live-aboards.

Diving Ko Samui and the Samui Archipelago

  • Sail Rock between Ko Tao and Ko Pha-Ngan is the region’s most popular dive spot and is appropriate for all levels of divers. The pinnacle, which towers about nine meters (10 yd) above the surface, is a magnet for fish, so there’s plenty of colorful marinelife to be spotted. The swim-through chimney, a cavernous tunnel through the pinnacle, is a must-do for anyone visiting Sail Rock.
  • Just under 10 kilometers (6 mi) northwest of Ko Tao is Chumphon Pinnacle, a very popular granite pinnacle that does not break the surface. The base is covered with colorful anemones and attracts plenty of large and small fish. Large whale sharks are often spotted here, as are leopard sharks.
  • Southeast of Ko Tao is Shark Rocks, a grouping of rocks surrounded by colorful coral and anemones. Snappers, rays, and angelfish congregate in the rocks and, as you might suspect from the name, so do sharks.
  • Just north of Ko Pha-Ngan (connected by a strip of sand at low tide) is Ko Ma, which has some vibrant and healthy hard and soft coral as well as lots of vivid marinelife. Given its proximity to the main island and its suitability for divers of all levels, this is often where beginning divers are taken when they are getting certified.
  • The three interconnected islands of Ko Nang Yuan also offer some nice snorkeling and diving opportunities. The coral reef attracts plenty of smaller fish and is a nice place for beginning divers and for snorkelers. Nang Yuan Pinnacle, a small granite pinnacle below the surface, attracts larger fish that have come to feed.

Thailand Dive Shops, Courses, and Certification

In Thailand most diving instruction courses offer PADI open-water diver certification. These courses take 3-4 days, at the end of which you’ll be certified to dive all over the world. You’ll spend time in the classroom first learning about safety and dive theory, take your first dive in a swimming pool, and advance to supervised open-water dives. Expect to pay 10,000-15,000 baht for the full course, including equipment and dives. If you can’t imagine wasting hours inside a classroom while you’re on vacation, and assuming there is a PADI training center where you live, you can do the classroom and pool-diving components of your training at home and bring your referral paperwork with you to Thailand, where you’ll be able to complete the open-water portion of the certification.

Certified divers looking to advance their skills can also take dive master courses, become certified diving instructors, and arrange training internships at some of the larger training centers. These programs are at least two weeks long and cost 30,000-75,000 baht.

There are many dive shops in the area, especially on Ko Tao, which has dozens. Safety records across Thailand’s diving industry are good, but make sure to inspect equipment and talk to the instructors and dive masters you’ll be with before signing up to make sure you’re comfortable with them. Also ask about environmental awareness. PADI divers should follow a strict no-hands rule, but some dive shops have been known to be somewhat lax about it (touching or even brushing up against coral can damage it).

On Ko Tao, especially, many dive shops also have small guesthouses, and you’ll get a discounted rate (sometimes just a few hundred baht) if you’re taking lessons or going out on dives with them. Accommodations run the gamut from basic and clean to luxurious. You’ll be surrounded by fellow divers if you choose to stay in one of these guesthouses.

There are also plenty of dive shops on Ko Samui and Ko Pha-Ngan that offer diving trips and equipment. You can also take 3-4-day PADI diving certification courses at shops on the islands. Live-aboards tend to be less popular in this part of the country; instead, most diving is done on day trips or multiday trips where divers sleep in basic accommodations on one of the islands in Ang Thong National Marine Park.

Travel map of the Phuket and Ko Samui region of Thailand

Travel map of the Phuket and Ko Samui region of Thailand


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Phuket & Ko Samui.

The post Diving Thailand’s Coasts appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/08/diving-thailands-coasts/feed/ 0 40983
Diving Nicaragua’s Corn Islands https://moon.com/2016/04/diving-nicaraguas-corn-islands/ https://moon.com/2016/04/diving-nicaraguas-corn-islands/#respond Wed, 27 Apr 2016 19:13:44 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=37666 Three distinct layers of reef, composed of more than 40 species of coral, protect the north side of Big Corn Island. The diving and snorkeling are impressive, and divers regularly see nurse sharks, eagle rays, and lots of colorful fish. The wilder Little Corn Island's delicate reef system is unique for its abundance of wildlife and coral formations, including overhangs, swim-throughs, and the infamous shark cave.

The post Diving Nicaragua’s Corn Islands appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Eighty-three kilometers due east of Bluefields Bay’s brackish brown water, the Corn Islands are a pair of Tertiary-period volcanic basalt bumps in the Caribbean. Formerly home base for lobster fishermen and their families, the islanders are increasingly turning to tourism for their future. How well the fragile island ecosystem will support it will determine the fate of the islands.

The tops of wreckage emerge from the turquoise water at Nicaragua's Corn Islands.

The wreckage of a sunken ship in the turquoise waters at Nicaragua’s Corn Islands.

Big Corn Island

The mangrove swamps and estuaries that line several stretches of coastline are crucial to the island’s water supply, and the islanders have fiercely resisted attempts by foreign investors to drain or fill them.Big Corn Island is 10 square kilometers of forested hills, mangrove swamps, and stretches of white coral beaches. The mangrove swamps and estuaries that line several stretches of coastline are crucial to the island’s water supply, and the islanders have fiercely resisted attempts by foreign investors to drain or fill them. Of the six sea turtle species swimming off Nicaragua’s shores, four live in Caribbean waters. On land, Corn Island boasts three endemic species of reptiles and amphibians, all threatened by the continued swamp draining. The highest points are Quinn Hill, Little Hill (55 and 57 meters above sea level, respectively), and Mount Pleasant (97 meters).

Diving

Three distinct layers of reef, composed of more than 40 species of coral, protect the north side of the island. The diving and snorkeling are impressive, and divers regularly see nurse sharks, eagle rays, and lots of colorful fish. Unfortunately, the reefs closest to shore have deteriorated over the past decades, victims of overfishing, predatory algae (which grow as a result of increased nutrient levels in the water from sewage runoff), sedimentation, storm damage, and global warming. Blowing Rock is a rock formation with lots of color and dozens of varieties of tropical fish. Any of the island’s dive shops will take you there. A few sandy stretches of beach along the north shore allow you to get into the water. One good one is in front of Dorsey Campbell’s Yellowtail House.

A mother and son from the U.S. co-own a full-service, modern dive shop in North End. Dos Tiburones Dive Shop (tel. 505/2575-5167) offers scuba gear and the services of PADI- and SSI-affiliated dive-masters. They offer an introductory course ($335), a two-tank dive ($65), and a dive at Blowing Rock ($95). The shop’s Dive Café offers fresh-ground coffee and smoothies you can sip from a lawn chair on the beach out back. Corn Island Dive Center (across from Best View Hotel in North End, tel. 505/8851-5704 or 505/8735-0667) is PADI-affiliated and offers similar services: a dive at Blowing Rock ($85), two tanks ($65), and snorkeling ($25). Not sure if you want to get certified? Or, need to brush up on rusty skills? Try it out or do a review ($65) at either shop.

Maps - Nicaragua 6e - Big Corn Island

Big Corn Island

Little Corn Island

A humble, wilder version of Big Corn, “La Islita” is a mere three square kilometers of sand and trees, laced with footpaths and encircled by nine kilometers of coral reef. Little Corn is a delicate destination, visited by an increasing number of travelers each year. There are clever accommodations for several budgets to meet the demand, but rough boat transport from Big Corn—an experience one traveler likened to pursuing a narco-panga across 15 kilometers of open swell—will help hold the masses at bay. Bring a flashlight, your snorkel gear, and a good book.

Little Corn Island is irregularly policed by volunteers and has experienced a handful of violent attacks on tourists in recent years. The security situation is sometimes better, sometimes worse. Ask at your hotel for the latest news and advice on staying safe. Above all, don’t walk alone on the beaches, or at night. For medical needs, you can find a meager health clinic just south of the Hotel Los Delfines. Anything complicated requires a panga ride back to the big island, or even Bluefields.

Diving

Little Corn’s delicate reef system is unique for its abundance of wildlife and coral formations, including overhangs, swim-throughs, and the infamous shark cave. Most dives around the island are shallow (less than 60 feet), but a few deeper dives exist as well. The island’s bigger scuba shop, Dive Little Corn (south of the new pier on Pelican Beach, tel. 505/8856-5888), operates out of a wooden building. They offer morning and afternoon dives for novice through advanced divers, night dives by appointment, hourly and all-day snorkel trips, PADI certification, and kayak rentals. Hotel Los Delfines has Dolphin Dive (tel. 505/8917-9717, info@Dolphindivelittlecorn.com), which offers PADI certification.

Maps - Nicaragua 6e - Little Corn Island

Little Corn Island


Excerpted from the Sixth Edition of Moon Nicaragua.

The post Diving Nicaragua’s Corn Islands appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/04/diving-nicaraguas-corn-islands/feed/ 0 37666
Diving Isla del Coco Marine National Park https://moon.com/2016/03/diving-isla-del-coco-marine-national-park/ https://moon.com/2016/03/diving-isla-del-coco-marine-national-park/#respond Tue, 08 Mar 2016 22:03:42 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=33477 The only true oceanic island off Central America, Parque Nacional Marino Isla del Coco is one of the world’s best diving spots, famous for its massive schools of white-tipped and hammerhead sharks, eerie manta rays, pilot whales, whale sharks, and sailfish. Snorkelers swimming closer to the surface can revel in moray eels and colorful reef fish.

The post Diving Isla del Coco Marine National Park appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
The only true oceanic island off Central America, Parque Nacional Marino Isla del Coco—500 kilometers (300 miles) southwest of Costa Rica—is a 52-square-kilometer (20-square-mile) mountainous chunk of land, called Cocos Island in English, that rises to 634 meters (2,080 feet) at Cerro Iglesias. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997, the island is the northernmost and oldest of a chain of submarine volcanoes stretching south along the Cocos Ridge to the equator, where several come to the surface as the Galápagos Islands. These islands were formed by a hot spot, which pushes up volcanic material from beneath the earth’s crust. The hot spot deep inside the earth remains stationary, while the sea floor moves over it. Over time, the volcanic cone is transported away from the hot spot and a new volcano arises in the same place.

Waterfall at Isla del Coco.

Waterfall at Isla del Coco. Photo © J Rawls, licensed Creative Commons Attribution 2.0.

The pirate William Davies supposedly hid his treasure here in 1684, as did Portuguese buccaneer Benito “Bloody Sword” Bonito in 1889.Cliffs reach higher than 100 meters (330 feet) around almost the entire island, and dramatic waterfalls cascade onto the beach. Cocos’s forested hills supposedly harbor gold doubloons. More than 500 expeditions have sought in vain to find the Lima Booty—gold and silver ingots that mysteriously disappeared while en route to Spain under the care of Captain James Thompson. The pirate William Davies supposedly hid his treasure here in 1684, as did Portuguese buccaneer Benito “Bloody Sword” Bonito in 1889. The government has placed a moratorium on treasure hunts.

Isla del Coco is inhabited only by national park guards who patrol the park equipped with small Zodiac boats. The only safe anchorage for entry is at Bahía Chatham, on the northeast corner, where scores of rocks are etched with the names and dates of ships dating back to the 17th century.

There are no native mammals. The surrounding waters, however, are home to four unique species of marine mollusks. The island has one butterfly and two lizard species to call its own. Three species of birds are endemic: the Cocos finch, Cocos cuckoo, and the Ridgeway or Cocos flycatcher. Three species of boobies—red-footed, masked, and brown—live here too. Isla del Coco is also a popular spot for frigate birds to roost and mate, and white terns may hover above your head. Feral pigs, introduced in the 18th century by passing sailors, today number about 5,000 and have caused substantial erosion.

Access to the island is restricted. The waters around the island are under threat from illegal longline fishing. The Fundación Amigos de la Isla del Coco (Friends of Cocos Island, FAICO, tel. 506/2256-7476) works to protect the area from illegal fishing.

Isla del Coco.

Isla del Coco. Photo © Rodtico21 (Own work) CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

Diving

The island is one of the world’s best diving spots, famous for its massive schools of white-tipped and hammerhead sharks, eerie manta rays, pilot whales, whale sharks, and sailfish. Snorkelers swimming closer to the surface can revel in moray eels and colorful reef fish.

Cocos is for experienced divers only. Drop-offs are deep, currents are continually changing, and beginning divers would freak out at the huge shark populations. Converging ocean currents stir up such a wealth of nutrients that the sharks have a surfeit of fish to feed on, and taking a chunk out of a diver is probably the last thing on their minds.

Two dive vessels operate out of Los Sueños Marina. The Okeanos Aggressor (U.S. tel. 866-348-2628) is a 34-meter (112-foot) fully air-conditioned 10-stateroom ship with complete facilities for 21 divers. It offers 8- and 10-day trips. Undersea Hunter (tel. 506/2228-6613, U.S. tel. 800-203-2120) operates 10- and 12-day Isla del Coco trips using the 18-passenger MV Sea Hunter and the 14-passenger MV Undersea Hunter.

Information and Services

For information, contact MINAE (tel. 506/2291-1215 or 506/2291-1216, isla.coco@sinac.co.cr), the government department that administers national parks, or the ranger station (tel. 506/2542-3290). There are no accommodations on the island, and camping is not allowed.


Excerpted from the Tenth Edition of Moon Costa Rica.

The post Diving Isla del Coco Marine National Park appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/03/diving-isla-del-coco-marine-national-park/feed/ 0 33477
Things to Do in Drake Bay, Costa Rica https://moon.com/2016/02/things-to-do-drake-bay-costa-rica/ https://moon.com/2016/02/things-to-do-drake-bay-costa-rica/#comments Mon, 15 Feb 2016 18:20:36 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=33463 On the north side of the Osa Peninsula, Drake Bay lies between the mouth of the Río Sierpe and the vastness of Parque Nacional Corcovado. It's a good base for sportfishing and scuba diving, and for hikes into nearby wildlife refuges and the national park.

The post Things to Do in Drake Bay, Costa Rica appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
On the north side of the Osa Peninsula, Drake Bay, pronounced “DRA-kay” locally, lies between the mouth of the Río Sierpe and the vastness of Parque Nacional Corcovado. It is a good base for sportfishing and scuba diving, and for hikes into nearby wildlife refuges and the national park. The bay is named for English sea captain Francis Drake, who supposedly anchored the Golden Hind in the tranquil bay in March 1579.

Horseback riders on the beach near Drake Bay. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Horseback riders on the beach near Drake Bay. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

There are four-day, three-night eco-camps and conservation camps for environmentally minded travelers.Most people fly in or take a boat from Sierpe. You can also drive from Rincón via a recently graded dirt road (which requires fording two rivers) via the community of Rancho Quemado.

Marine turtles come ashore to nest, and whales pass by close to shore. There’s good snorkeling at the southern end of the bay, where a coastal trail leads to the mouth of the Río Agujitas, good for exploring by canoe.

You can follow a coast trail south via Playa Cocalito (immediately south) and Playa Caletas, four kilometers (2.5 miles) along, and a series of golden-sand beaches, ending 13 kilometers (8 miles) farther at Playa Josecito on the edge of Parque Nacional Corcovado. There are lodgings along the route; however, hiking all the way is often impossible, as the Río Claro is sometimes impassable, especially in wet season.

Maps - Costa Rica 10e - The Osa Peninsula

The Osa Peninsula

Nature Reserves

The 500-hectare (1,200-acre) Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Punta Río Claro is a wildlife refuge that sits above and behind Playa Caletas and Punta Marenco. The reserve forms a buffer zone for Parque Nacional Corcovado and is home to all four local monkey species and other wildlife species common to Corcovado. The area’s 400-plus bird species include the scarlet macaw. Here, the Punta Marenco Lodge (tel. 506/8877-3535) serves as a center for scientific research and welcomes ecotourists. Resident biologists lead nature hikes ($35).

Farther south, Proyecto Campanario (tel. 506/2289-8694), bordering Parque Nacional Corcovado, protects 100 hectares (250 acres) of rainforest and has trails. The Campanario Biological Station operates principally as a “university in the field” and offers courses in neotropical ecology. There are four-day, three-night eco-camps and conservation camps for environmentally minded travelers. Accommodations are offered in a field station with bunkrooms and in a simple tent camp.

At the shore in Costa Rica's Parque Nacional Corcovado.

At the shore in Costa Rica’s Parque Nacional Corcovado. Photo © Miguel Vieira, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

The Estación Biológica Tamandúa (Tamandúa Biological Station, tel. 506/2775-1456) at La Bijagua, two kilometers (1.2 miles) southeast of Agujitas on the dirt road to Los Planos, has rainforest trails as well as tours to Corcovado. You can camp here, and there are cabins. It’s run by the Arguijos family and is accessible only in dry season.

The Fundación Corcovado (Corcovado Foundation, tel. 506/2297-3013) strives to protect the Osa Peninsula.

Nighttime Insect Tour

Professional entomologist Tracie Stice—the “Bug Lady”—and Costa Rican naturalist Gianfranco Gomez run a marvelously educational nocturnal bug hunt, the Nighttime Insect Tour (tel. 506/8701-7356, 7:30pm daily, $35). The 2.5-hour tour is fascinating and fun, made more so by Tracie’s wit and enthralling anecdotes on such themes as six-legged sex and eight-eyed erotica. Reservations are strongly recommended and can be made through individual lodges.

Adventure Sports

Costa Rica Adventure Divers (tel. 506/2231-5806, U.S. tel. 866-553-7070) is based at Jinetes de Osa hotel, at the southern edge of Agujitas, and has dive trips to Isla Caño. Pirate Cove (tel. 506/2234-6154 or 506/8393-9449) also specializes in diving. The Águila de Osa Inn (tel. 506/2296-2190), at the mouth of the Río Agujitas, specializes in sportfishing and also has scuba diving and mangrove tours, and can arrange dolphin-spotting tours, birding ($35), mountain biking ($35), and kayaking.

Scuba divers set out from the Águila de Osa Inn at Drake Bay. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

Scuba divers set out from the Águila de Osa Inn at Drake Bay. Photo © Christopher P. Baker.

The Corcovado Canopy Tour (tel. 506/8810-8908), at Los Planos, a 20-minute drive from Agujitas, has 14 platforms and 12 zip-line cables.

Nightlife

The hot spot in Agujitas is La Jungla Bar (tel. 506/2775-0570, 2pm-2am daily). A rustically elegant bar is the yin to the yang of the adjoining cement-floor disco ($2-5), which sometimes has live music.

La Jungla has stolen the thunder from nearby Bar y Restaurante Jade Mar (tel. 506/8822-8595, 6am-1am daily), a modern open-air eatery with a large-screen TV. It hosts a weekend disco (but watch that slippery tile floor).


Excerpted from the Tenth Edition of Moon Costa Rica.

The post Things to Do in Drake Bay, Costa Rica appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/02/things-to-do-drake-bay-costa-rica/feed/ 1 33463
Diving Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo https://moon.com/2016/02/diving-santuario-de-flora-y-fauna-malpelo/ https://moon.com/2016/02/diving-santuario-de-flora-y-fauna-malpelo/#respond Wed, 10 Feb 2016 18:39:10 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=32425 Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo is the largest no-fishing zone in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, making it one of the top places for diving in the world. There are 11 main dive sites, including the most important site, La Nevera, where it is common to see scores of hammerhead sharks. Malpelo is for experienced divers only; to get there you must coordinate with one these authorized outfitters in Colombia.

The post Diving Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Covering around 900,000 hectares (2.2 million acres) of protected Pacific Ocean waters and the tiny Isla Malpelo in Colombia, the Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo (COP$85,000-159,000) was established in 1995. The area was declared a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area by the International Maritime Organization in 2002 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. The steep volcanic rock of Isla Malpelo is nearly 500 kilometers (300 miles) from the coast of Colombia. It is administered by Parques Nacionales (tel. 1/353-2400, ext. 138).

Even experienced divers will be blown away by the diversity of sea life in the Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo. Photo © Fundación Malpelo y Otros Ecosistemas Marinos.

Even experienced divers will be blown away by the diversity of sea life in the Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo. Photo © Fundación Malpelo y Otros Ecosistemas Marinos.

It is the largest no-fishing zone in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, thus making it one of the top places for diving in the world.It is the largest no-fishing zone in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, thus making it one of the top places for diving in the world. There are 11 main dive sites, including the most important site, La Nevera, where it is common to see scores of hammerhead sharks. The deep waters surrounding the island are home to some of the most important coral formations in the Colombian Pacific. Mollusks and crustaceans, fish such as snapper, endangered mero (grouper), large populations of hammerhead sharks, whale sharks, sun ray sharks, and manta rays are found in abundance in the sanctuary. It is one of the few places in the world where the short-nosed ragged-toothed shark, a deepwater shark, has been spotted. Inhospitable to much animal life, the island is home to crabs, lizards, and geckos. Among birds, the largest colony in the world of the Nazca booby is found on Malpelo.

Malpelo is for experienced divers only. To get there you must coordinate with one of the following authorized diving tour groups:

The Fundación Malpelo is a nonprofit organization working to protect this sanctuary. The island is under constant threat from illegal fishing, particularly of hammerhead sharks. In 2012 it was estimated that 200 tons of fish were illegally caught in the Colombian Pacific, mostly by boats hailing from Costa Rica, Ecuador, and from Asian countries. During Holy Week, shark fin stew is sold in Buenaventura.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Colombia.

The post Diving Santuario de Flora y Fauna Malpelo appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/02/diving-santuario-de-flora-y-fauna-malpelo/feed/ 0 32425
How to Choose a Dive Shop in Cancún & Cozumel https://moon.com/2016/01/how-to-choose-a-dive-shop-in-cancun-cozumel/ https://moon.com/2016/01/how-to-choose-a-dive-shop-in-cancun-cozumel/#respond Thu, 28 Jan 2016 12:24:12 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=9788 There are more than 100 dive shops on Isla Cozumel, and scores more at Isla Mujeres, Playa del Carmen, Cancún, Tulum, and elsewhere. Choosing just one can be daunting. Here are some tips for finding the right dive shop for you.

The post How to Choose a Dive Shop in Cancún & Cozumel appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
There are more than 100 dive shops on Isla Cozumel, and scores more at Isla Mujeres, Playa del Carmen, Cancún, Tulum, and elsewhere. Choosing just one—and then placing all your underwater faith into its hands—can be daunting.

Red flags lined up on a dock with a charter boat waiting in the turquoise water.

The dock at Fiesta Americana’s Dive Resort Cozumel. Photo © Serge Melki, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

If the staff is reluctant to show you the gear, either they aren’t too proud of it or they don’t see clients as equal partners in dive safety—both red flags.

Safety should be your number-one concern in choosing a shop. Fortunately, the standards in Cozumel and the Riviera Maya are almost universally first-rate, and accidents are rare. But that’s not a reason to be complacent. For example, don’t dive with a shop that doesn’t ask to see your certification card or logbook—if they didn’t ask you, they probably didn’t ask anyone else, and ill-trained divers are as dangerous to others in the group as they are to themselves.

Also ask how long the shop has been in business, how much experience the dive guides have, how long the captain and crew have been with the shop, and how many divers per guide will be on the tour. “Cattle boats” are a sign of shops trying to maximize profits; even if they’re not unsafe, they often make for a less enjoyable experience.

Equipment is another crucial issue. You should ask to inspect the shop’s equipment, and the dive shop should be quick to comply. Although few casual divers are trained to evaluate gear, a good dive shop will appreciate your concern and be happy to put you at ease. If the staff is reluctant to show you the gear, either they aren’t too proud of it or they don’t see clients as equal partners in dive safety—both red flags.

Of course, the most important equipment is not what’s on the rack but what you actually use. On the day of your dive, get to the shop early so you have time to double-check your gear. Old equipment is not necessarily bad equipment, but you should ask for a different BCD, wetsuit, or regulator if the condition of the one assigned to you makes you uneasy. Learn how to check the O-ring (the small rubber ring that forms the seal between the tank and the regulator), and do so before every dive. You also should attach your regulator and open the valve, to listen for any hissing between the regulator and the tank, or in the primary and backup mouthpieces. If you hear any, ask the dive master to check it and, if need be, change the regulator. Arriving early lets you do all this before getting on the boat—ideally before leaving the shop—so you can swap gear if necessary.

Feeling comfortable and free to ask questions or raise concerns (of any sort at any time) is a crucial factor in safe diving. That’s where a dive shop’s personality comes in. Every dive shop has its own culture or style, and different divers will feel more comfortable in different shops. Spend some time talking to people at a couple of different dive shops before signing up. Try to meet the person who will be leading your particular dive—you may have to come in the afternoon when that day’s trip returns. Chances are one of the shops or dive masters will click with you.

Finally, there are some specific questions you should ask about a shop’s practices. Has their air been tested and certified? Do they carry radios and oxygen? Does the captain always stay with the boat? How many people will be going on your dive? How advanced are they? And how many dive masters or instructors will there be? How experienced are they? Above all, be vocal and proactive about your safety, and remember there are no stupid questions.

And, of course, have fun!


Excerpted from the Twelfth Edition of Moon Cancun & Cozumel.

The post How to Choose a Dive Shop in Cancún & Cozumel appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/01/how-to-choose-a-dive-shop-in-cancun-cozumel/feed/ 0 9788
Salt Island and the Wreck of the RMS Rhone https://moon.com/2016/01/salt-island-wreck-of-the-rms-rhone/ https://moon.com/2016/01/salt-island-wreck-of-the-rms-rhone/#respond Fri, 22 Jan 2016 17:14:56 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=33398 Many islands in the Virgins have salt ponds where crystal salt was collected, but no island had a larger or more productive pond than Salt Island. It's also home to the wreck of the RMS Rhone, the preeminent dive site in the British Virgin Islands and one of its most visited attractions. Learn about the island's history and how to thoroughly explore the Rhone's remains.

The post Salt Island and the Wreck of the RMS Rhone appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Before refrigeration, islanders relied on salt to preserve meat. Many islands in the Virgins have salt ponds where crystal salt was collected, but no island had a larger or more productive pond than Salt Island, a small T-shaped island about five miles from Tortola. For centuries the small settlement on Salt Island thrived on the salt industry.

The Salt Island coastline, viewed from the water, with white, fluffy clouds in the background.

No one lives on Salt Island year-round, although some Salt Islanders who live on Tortola come back regularly and tend the smattering of houses in the bay. Photo © Peter Pawlowski, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

Traditionally, the Salt Island harvest was a time of great festivity. Residents from nearby islands would travel there to watch as a government agent supervised the “breaking of the pond.”Salt is harvested in the early spring, before the rainy season begins. Traditionally, the Salt Island harvest was a time of great festivity. Residents from nearby islands would travel there to watch as a government agent supervised the “breaking of the pond.” After it was harvested from the pond, the salt was dried in a special salt house. Up to 1,000 pounds of salt were harvested annually from Salt Island. Today, islanders still harvest salt, but on a much smaller scale. Most of it is finely ground and mixed with local seasonings to make “seasoning salt” for fish and meat.

No one still lives on Salt Island year-round, although some Salt Islanders who live on Tortola come back regularly and tend the smattering of houses in the bay. The settlement along the north coast is a cluster of simple homes, set amid coconut palms. There are no restaurants, snack bars, or stores, and no electricity or potable water. But the settlement provides a unique glimpse into the past.

When you visit, look around the settlement for signs of life. If someone happens to be home, be sure to extend them the courtesy of a greeting and an explanation of what you intend to do. Someone may even agree to show you around. Hiking trails circle the pond, or you can trek over to South Bay in the west or the Sound in the east. There is a cemetery of Rhone shipwreck victims a few dozen yards from the settlement in Lee Bay. And remember: Don’t disturb the salt pond or take any salt unless you have permission.

The Wreck of the RMS Rhone

The wreck of the RMS Rhone is the preeminent dive site in the British Virgin Islands and one of its most visited attractions. The 310-foot twin-masted steamer, which sank during a ferocious hurricane in 1867, lies in three sections west of Salt Island and has beckoned underwater explorers for decades. In 1977 it was the primary filming location for the movie The Deep, starring Nick Nolte and Jacqueline Bisset.

Lying in 65-80 feet of water, the bow is the deepest, largest, and most intact section of the Rhone. Here divers can enter the interior of the vessel and will find the mast and crow’s nest still attached to the ship. The midsection, lying in about 60 feet of water, is dominated by a series of support beams—all that remains of the ship’s deck. The stern, the shallowest part of the wreck, can be explored by snorkelers as well as divers. It features the ship’s large rudder and 15-foot propeller.

Divers should not try to explore the whole wreck in one dive. It is too deep, and there is too much to see. The best way to explore the ship is to start with a dive on the deepest section, the bow, and follow that with another dive on the stern and midsection. If you really want to get to know this wreck, however, you will need to plan more than two dives and include one at night, when it comes alive with unusual and colorful sealife.

Diving at the RMS Rhone National Park wreck site. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Diving at the RMS Rhone National Park wreck site. Photo © Susanna Henighan Potter.

Visibility around the wreck is usually good—between 60 and 100 feet. The bow and midsection are sometimes susceptible to currents. For ease and safety, always go diving with a local dive company, since staff will be familiar with local conditions and dangers.

Local dive boats visit the Rhone every day of the year. In fact, many days it seems like a whole fleet makes the journey. For the best experience, choose a dive boat that specializes in small groups and avoid the busiest times, 9am-noon and 2pm-4pm.

Getting to Salt Island

There is no ferry service to Salt Island. Sail Caribbean Divers (284/495-1675) offers an occasional day trip to Salt Island which includes sightseeing around the settlement, a hike, and snorkeling at the RMS Rhone.

Sailors can anchor at Salt Island Bay or moor at Lee Bay. Both are exposed, however, and are considered day-use only.

Descendants of Salt Island residents usually organize a day trip, including ferry and lunch, on a bank holiday in the springtime. Ask around or check the local papers and radio stations for advertisements of this outing.


Excerpted from the Sixth Edition of Moon U.S. & British Virgin Islands.

The post Salt Island and the Wreck of the RMS Rhone appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/01/salt-island-wreck-of-the-rms-rhone/feed/ 0 33398
Plan a Visit to Bacalar Chico National Park Marine Reserve https://moon.com/2016/01/plan-a-visit-bacalar-chico-national-park-marine-reserve/ https://moon.com/2016/01/plan-a-visit-bacalar-chico-national-park-marine-reserve/#respond Tue, 05 Jan 2016 22:43:07 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=33541 Located on and around the northern tip of Ambergris Caye, Bacalar Chico National Park and Marine Reserve hosts an incredibly diverse array of wildlife, offers excellent snorkeling and diving, and is rich with history. Here's your guide to planning a visit, from all about the reserve's sights to where to stay, what to eat, and how to get there.

The post Plan a Visit to Bacalar Chico National Park Marine Reserve appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Located on and around the northern tip of Ambergris Caye, Bacalar Chico National Park and Marine Reserve hosts an incredibly diverse array of wildlife, offers excellent snorkeling and diving, and is rich with history. The Bacalar Chico Canal is reputed to have been dug by Mayan traders between AD 700 and 900, creating Ambergris Caye by separating it from the Yucatán Peninsula.

The reserve has a wide range of wildlife habitat; 194 species of birds have been sighted there. The landscape consists in part of sinkholes and cenotes created by the effects of weathering on the limestone bedrock of Ambergris Caye. On the eastern side of the reserve is Rocky Point, the only location in the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System where the reef touches the shore. This is one of Belize’s most important and prolific sea turtle nesting sites, home to at least 10 threatened species. In 1997, Bacalar Chico—along with the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System—was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

Four-eyed butterfly fish along the Belize Barrier Reef. Photo © Lebawit Lily Girma.

Four-eyed butterflyfish along the Belize Barrier Reef. Photo © Lebawit Lily Girma.

In 1997, Bacalar Chico—along with the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System—was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.Bacalar Chico also contains at least nine archaeological sites: Mayan trading, fishing, and agricultural settlements that were inhabited from at least AD 300 to 900. A 10th site just outside the reserve boundary is regarded as especially important for its remaining wall network throughout the settlement and its potential to provide missing information about the transition from the classic Mayan period to modern times. The reserve also contains evidence of Spanish and English habitation during the colonial period, including several Spanish-period shipwrecks offshore.

A ranger station in the northwest area of the park has a visitors center (tel. 501/226-2833) and displays of area history, including old glass bottles and Mayan relics found within the reserve. A picnic area offers a barbecue.

Accommodations and Food

The best place to stay nearest Bacalar is on a beautiful hard-packed white-sand beach 12 miles north of San Pedro. The boat ride from town takes anywhere from 30 to 40 minutes, well past the last stop on the water taxi. This is the best option for folks who want to feel like they are on another island, not for people who want to drive golf carts, party, and be “in the mix” (though all the standard tours are still available, probably with a little extra transportation cost).

Tranquility Bay Resort (U.S. tel. 800/843-2293, from US$139) is the only resort on the island where you can snorkel directly from the beach to the reef. Every evening, tarpon, barracuda, and eagle rays swim under the lights of the dockside restaurant, appropriately named The Aquarium. There’s a budget room just off the beach, along with seven brightly painted two-bedroom cabanas and three one-bedrooms with lofts, lining one of the nicest white-sand beaches on the island. Bedrooms are air-conditioned, and each cabana is equipped with a refrigerator and a microwave. The cabins have Belizean hardwoods, Mexican tiles, and spectacular ocean views. The resort offers free use of kayaks, which can cover a lot of ground at this site, and there is an on-site dive shop. Fishing, snorkeling, scuba, and sailing trips are available.

Getting There

Most Ambergris dive shops and a few tour companies that do dive and snorkel trips to Bacalar Chico are based in San Pedro. Start with Seaduced by Belize (tel. 501/226-2254, US$105 pp) and Searious Adventures (tel. 501/226-4202, US$90), or arrange a trip with Tranquility Bay Resort (U.S. tel. 800/843-2293).


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Belize Cayes.

The post Plan a Visit to Bacalar Chico National Park Marine Reserve appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/01/plan-a-visit-bacalar-chico-national-park-marine-reserve/feed/ 0 33541
Visit Belize’s Tobacco Caye https://moon.com/2016/01/visit-tobacco-caye-belize/ https://moon.com/2016/01/visit-tobacco-caye-belize/#respond Mon, 04 Jan 2016 22:09:55 +0000 http://moon.type5.co/?p=748 If your tropical island dream includes sharing said island with a few dozen fellow travelers, snorkelers, divers, rum drinkers, and hammock sitters from around the world, then Tobacco Caye is your place.

The post Visit Belize’s Tobacco Caye appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
If your tropical island dream includes sharing a small, rustic island with a few dozen travelers, snorkelers, divers, backpackers, and adventurous souls from around the world, then Tobacco Caye is your place. This tiny island, located within South Water Caye Marine Reserve, has long been a popular backpacker and Belizean tourism destination, especially for divers. Tobacco Caye is just north of Tobacco Cut (a “cut” is a break in the reef through which boats can navigate).

As part of a resort package, boats will whisk you each day to snorkeling and fishing trips or to Man-O-War Caye and Tobacco Range to look for manatees. Glover’s Reef, Blue Hole, and Turneffe trips are available (US$150-200); whale shark tours are usually running March-July.

Two chairs on a dock in clear shallow water surrounded by palm trees.

Tobacco Caye has an abundance of great spots to sit and enjoy the ocean.
Photo by Martjin Munneke licensed Creative Commons attribution.

Where to Stay

Tobacco Caye’s “resorts” offer similar packages but for a range of budgets. All accommodations are Belizean-run family affairs, each a bit different according to the owner’s vision, and are comfortably crowded together on the five acres of sand. Apart from some basic differences in room quality, the more you pay, the better the food you’ll be eating— a pretty important thing when checking into a guest room that also locks you into a meal plan. Some of the accommodation prices are per person per night and include three meals; always ask to be sure.

Tobacco Caye Paradise (tel. 501/532-2101 or 800/667-1630) occupies the northern tip of the island with six clean, basic cabins with porches built right over the sea (US$70 pp, includes 3 meals) that will make you want to stay forever.

Stepping things up a notch, find the renovated Reef’s End Lodge (tel. 501/542-2419, various packages include US$756 for 7 days or US$360 for 3 days, includes 3 meals) on the southern shore; seven guest rooms and cabanas have private balconies—with romantic sunset views—fans and hot and cold water with private baths. There is a bar and restaurant built over the water for those prepaid meals. Reef’s End has the caye’s only dive shop, which can be utilized by anyone on the island; this is an excellent location to begin a shore dive or snorkeling adventure. Dive packages are also available, ranging US$477-1,397 according to the number of days and include meals, transfers, and two local dives daily.

Joe Jo’s By The Reef (U.S. tel. 95954/249-5863, tel. 501/610-1647, US$75-95, includes 3 meals) welcomes you to one of its six new seafront cabanas with hardwood floors, hot water, and reef views from private decks.

Tobacco Caye Lodge (tel. 501/532-2033 or 501/223-6247, US$99 pp, includes 3 meals) occupies a middle strip of the island and offers six guest rooms in four colorful cabins facing the reef. You are summoned to meals by a dinner bell. There’s a small on-site bar and snack shop as well as hammocks on the beach. A few steps away, the Tobacco Marine Station (tel. 501/620-9116, www.tcmsbelize.org) hosts visiting scientists, and you can ask to check out their reference materials on the area’s habitats and species, use the Internet (US$5 per hour), rent snorkel gear (US$7.50 per day), or head out on a night snorkel (US$10 pp) with these experts.

Getting There

Water taxis to Tobacco Caye leave when the captain says there are enough passengers—usually around mid-afternoon from the Riverside Café or the Tackle Stop farther upstream. Captain Buck (tel. 501/669-0869) is one option, or try Fermin, a.k.a. Compa (tel. 501/666-8699). The trip costs US$15 one-way or US$35 round-trip, with a return trip usually made mid-morning. Captain Doggie (tel. 501/627-7443) is another charter option; he will take 1-3 people for US$70; groups of 4-12 can expect to pay US$17.50 per person. Compa has the newest, largest, and most comfortable boats. All the captains usually hang out by Riverside Café, either outside or inside.

By calling ahead to Blue Dolphin, Reef’s End Lodge, or Tobacco Caye Lodge, you can arrange a pickup any time from Dangriga and ensure a boat will still be there if you are arriving after midday. Be advised that if you need a boat after 3pm, you’ll pay a lot more—seas get rough, and a private charter is necessary. Plan accordingly.

Map of the Southern Coast of Belize

Southern Coast

Everything you need to know about Belize's Tobacco Caye


Excerpted from the Tenth Edition of Moon Belize.

The post Visit Belize’s Tobacco Caye appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/01/visit-tobacco-caye-belize/feed/ 0 748