Georgia | Moon Travel Guides https://moon.com Trip Ideas, Itineraries, Maps & Area Experts Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:01:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9 https://deathstar-650a.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/cropped-moon_logo_M-32x32.jpg Georgia | Moon Travel Guides https://moon.com 32 32 125073523 A Guided Tour of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site https://moon.com/2016/02/guided-tour-martin-luther-king-jr-national-historic-site/ https://moon.com/2016/02/guided-tour-martin-luther-king-jr-national-historic-site/#respond Mon, 15 Feb 2016 16:01:15 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=37731 Almost a million people make the pilgrimage to Atlanta each year to pay tribute to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Since 1980, the National Park Service has maintained the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, which includes the graves of King and his wife, the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, the King Birth Home, and Historic Fire Station No. 6.

The post A Guided Tour of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Almost a million people make the pilgrimage to Atlanta each year to pay tribute to the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Since 1980, the National Park Service has maintained the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, which includes the graves of King and his wife, the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, the King Birth Home, and Historic Fire Station No. 6.

The King Birth Home

The King birth home on Auburn Avenue. Photo © Tray Butler.

The King birth home on Auburn Avenue. Photo © Tray Butler.

Built in 1895, this Queen Anne-style dwelling housed several generations of the King family. For the first dozen years of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. shared the house with his grandparents, parents, brother, sisters, a great aunt, and an uncle. The King Birth Home (501 Auburn Ave., 404/331-6922, daily 10am-5pm) has been refurbished to reflect the aesthetics of the 1930s. Visitors who want to tour the King Birth Home should plan to arrive early to collect tickets at the National Park Service Visitor Center (450 Auburn Ave., daily 9am-5pm; tours are free but typically fill up fast because they’re limited to 15 people). The half-hour tours are led by park rangers.

Historic Fire Station No. 6

Atlanta’s oldest standing fire station, Historic Fire Station No. 6 was built in 1894 and served the Sweet Auburn neighborhood until 1991. It underwent a thorough renovation in 1995, and today the two-story redbrick Romanesque Revival building houses a museum (39 Boulevard, 404/331-5190, daily 10am-5pm, free) detailing the desegregation of Atlanta’s fire department and features a 1927 American LaFrance fire engine. Two of the original brass sliding poles also remain.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Photo © Lpkb/Dreamstime.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Photo © Lpkb/Dreamstime.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s father and grandfather presided at the Ebenezer Baptist Church (407 Auburn Ave., 404/688-7300, Mon.-Sat. 10am-5pm), which was built in 1922. King was baptized at Ebenezer as a child and ordained at the age of 19. His funeral was held here in 1968. In 1974, violence erupted in the church when a gunman shot and killed King’s mother, Alberta Christine Williams King, along with another deacon. The church’s congregation moved in 1999 to the massive Horizon Sanctuary across the street. Plan to spend 20-30 minutes sitting in the sanctuary, where recordings of King’s sermons play on repeat.


Excerpted from the Third Edition of Moon Atlanta.

The post A Guided Tour of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/02/guided-tour-martin-luther-king-jr-national-historic-site/feed/ 0 37731
African American Arts and Heritage in Atlanta https://moon.com/2016/02/african-american-arts-and-heritage-in-atlanta/ https://moon.com/2016/02/african-american-arts-and-heritage-in-atlanta/#respond Tue, 09 Feb 2016 16:10:57 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=37729 Atlanta has been called “the crown jewel in the story of black America” for good reason. The city’s distinction as a crossroads for equal opportunity dates back generations, due in no small part to the concentration of historically black colleges (the largest in the country) and long legacy of African American entrepreneurship and innovation. This unique heritage is also a major draw for tourism; no matter what the calendar says, it’s always Black History Month in Atlanta.

The post African American Arts and Heritage in Atlanta appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Atlanta has been called “the crown jewel in the story of black America” for good reason.

The city’s distinction as a crossroads for equal opportunity dates back generations, due in no small part to the concentration of historically black colleges (the largest in the country) and long legacy of African American entrepreneurship and innovation. This unique heritage is also a major draw for tourism. Almost a million people annually visit the burial site of Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta.

Each January, the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change and nearby Ebenezer Baptist Church host a full week of programming leading up to the federal MLK holiday and remain busy during February’s observance of Black History Month. The National Black Arts Festival, founded in 1987, has expanded beyond its traditional July programming to produce educational and cultural events year-round. No matter what the calendar says, it’s always Black History Month in Atlanta.

Frankie's BLues Mission on stage at NBAF.

Frankie’s Blues Mission on stage at NBAF. Photo © John Ramspott, licensed Creative Commons usage.

National Center for Civil and Human Rights

The latest addition to the growing tourist district surrounding Centennial Olympic Park, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights serves as an worthy complement to the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site. Interactive exhibitions help to place King’s life and the struggles of the 1960s in a global context.

The Atlanta University Center

Although the West End campuses of Atlanta’s historically black universities (including Spelman, Morehouse, and Morris Brown colleges) aren’t necessarily a must-see attraction, they do include a few gems for art lovers and African American history buffs. Clark Atlanta University Art Galleries (223 James P Brawley Dr., Tues.-Fri. 11am-5pm, free) features ambitious murals by Hale Woodruff and more than 600 works from the school’s historical collection of sculpture and paintings. Close by, the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art features works by and about women of the African diaspora.

High Museum of Art

The first general museum in North America to have a full-time curator dedicated to folk art, the High Museum of Art pays special tribute to Georgia native Nellie Mae Rowe. At Night Things Come to Me, on permanent display in the Nellie Mae Rowe Room, gives a peek at the colorful “haints” and “varmints” from African American folklore that often surface in the self-taught artist’s drawings and mixed-media sculpture. The outstanding folk art collection includes noteworthy works by Thornton Dial, Ulysses Davis, Sam Doyle, and others.

Sunner Time by artist Nellie Mae Rowe. Photo © Nellie Mae Rowe [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Sunner Time by artist Nellie Mae Rowe. Photo © Nellie Mae Rowe [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Sweet Auburn Historic District

Designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1976, the Sweet Auburn Historic District stretches from Courtland Street to the Downtown Connector. The six-square-block area was once an essential enclave for the city’s African American movers and shakers. Atlanta’s first black-owned office building rose here, as did the city’s first black-owned newspaper. The Royal Peacock Club hosted acts like Ray Charles, James Brown, and Aretha Franklin.

The APEX Museum includes historical information about Atlanta’s African American pioneers and the neighborhood’s role in civil rights history.


Excerpted from the Third Edition of Moon Atlanta.

The post African American Arts and Heritage in Atlanta appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2016/02/african-american-arts-and-heritage-in-atlanta/feed/ 0 37729
Travel Reading List: Novels Set in Georgia and the Carolinas https://moon.com/2014/11/travel-reading-list-novels-set-in-georgia-and-the-carolinas/ https://moon.com/2014/11/travel-reading-list-novels-set-in-georgia-and-the-carolinas/#respond Thu, 13 Nov 2014 16:53:22 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=16491 Gone With the Wind; Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil; Shoeless Joe (well, sort of) — some of the most classic works of American literature are set in the Carolinas and Georgia. Native Jim Morekis has compiled a list of required reading for literary times looking to enrich their experience while visiting these stalwart southern states.

The post Travel Reading List: Novels Set in Georgia and the Carolinas appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Prepare for your trip to the Carolinas and Georgia by brushing up on these American literary classics that just so happen to be set in those stalwart southern states.


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

Not exactly fiction but far from completely true, this modern crime classic definitely reads like a novel while remaining one of the unique travelogues of recent times.

Berendt, John. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. New York: Vintage, 1994.

godslittleacre

God’s Little Acre

Scandalous in its time for its graphic sexuality, Caldwell’s best-selling 1933 novel chronicles socioeconomic decay in the mill towns of South Carolina and Georgia during the Great Depression.

Caldwell, Erskine. God’s Little Acre. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1995.

Tobacco Road book cover

Tobacco Road

Lurid and sensationalist, this portrayal of a shockingly dysfunctional rural Georgia family during the Depression paved the way for Deliverance.

Caldwell, Erskine. Tobacco Road. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1932.

thelordsofdiscipline

The Lords of Discipline

For all practical purposes set at the Citadel, this novel takes you behind the scenes of the notoriously insular Charleston military college.

Conroy, Pat. The Lords of Discipline. New York: Bantam, 1985.

thewateriswide

The Water Is Wide

Immortal account of Conroy’s time teaching African American children in a two-room schoolhouse on “Yamacraw” (actually Daufuskie) Island.

Conroy, Pat. The Water Is Wide. New York: Bantam, 1987.

deliverance

Deliverance

Gripping and socially important tale of a North Georgia rafting expedition gone horribly awry.

Dickey, James. Deliverance. New York: Delta, 1970.

thecompletetalesofuncleremus

The Complete Tales of Uncle Remus

Atlanta folklorist Joel Chandler Harris broke new ground in oral history by compiling these African American folk stories.

Harris, Joel Chandler. The Complete Tales of Uncle Remus. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002.

shoelessjoe

Shoeless Joe

Magical realist novel about a man who hears a voice telling him to “build it and they will come” and constructs a baseball diamond in an Iowa cornfield. Later adapted into the hit film Field of Dreams starring Kevin Costner and—with a totally out-of-place New York accent—Ray Liotta as Greenville, South Carolina, native “Shoeless” Joe Jackson.

Kinsella, W. P. Shoeless Joe. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1982.

Gone with the Wind book cover

Gone with the Wind

The Atlanta author’s immortal tale of Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler and one of the most popular books of all time.

Mitchell, Margaret. Gone with the Wind. New York: MacMillan, 1936.

flanneryoconnor

Flannery O’Connor: Collected Works

A must-read volume for anyone wanting to understand the South and the Southern Gothic genre of literature.

O’Connor, Flannery. Flannery O’Connor: Collected Works. New York: Library of America, 1988.

thegoldbug

The Gold Bug

Inspired by his stint there with the U.S. Army, the great American author set this classic short story on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, near Charleston.

Poe, Edgar Allan. The Gold Bug. London: Hesperus Press, 2007.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Carolinas & Georgia.

The post Travel Reading List: Novels Set in Georgia and the Carolinas appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/11/travel-reading-list-novels-set-in-georgia-and-the-carolinas/feed/ 0 16491
Take a Literary Road Trip through the Carolinas and Georgia https://moon.com/2014/11/take-a-literary-road-trip-through-the-carolinas-and-georgia/ https://moon.com/2014/11/take-a-literary-road-trip-through-the-carolinas-and-georgia/#respond Fri, 07 Nov 2014 08:01:00 +0000 http://moon.com?p=16346&preview_id=16346 Ready to take a literary road trip? This week-plus driving tour takes you from the Appalachians to the ocean in the footsteps of the region’s most legendary authors.

The post Take a Literary Road Trip through the Carolinas and Georgia appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Take a walk around charming Beaufort, which inspired so much of the work of novelist Pat Conroy.

Take a walk around charming Beaufort, which inspired so much of the work of novelist Pat Conroy. Photo © anoldent, licensed Creative Commons Attribution & ShareAlike.

Ready to take a literary road trip? This week-plus driving tour takes you from the Appalachians to the ocean in the footsteps of the region’s most legendary authors.

Day 1

Your first stop is in Asheville, North Carolina. Enjoy a relaxing walk through the vibrant downtown, capped by a visit at the centrally located Thomas Wolfe home. A short drive away in Flat Rock is the home of poet Carl Sandburg. Retire to your swank room at the Grove Park Inn.

Day 2

Get up bright and early for a drive down to Nantahala Outdoor Center on the Georgia-South Carolina border for some white-water rafting on the scenic Chattooga River, setting of the 1972 film adapted from James Dickey’s novel Deliverance. Tonight, enjoy a hearty dinner at the nearby Dillard House in Dillard, Georgia, also a B&B where you’ll stay the night.

Day 3

Make the short drive to Atlanta and a visit to the Margaret Mitchell House, a.k.a. “The Dump,” where the former newspaper reporter wrote the novel Gone with the Wind over a 10-year period. After a Southern comfort food lunch at nearby Mary Mac’s Tea Room, venture into west Atlanta for a visit at the Wren’s Nest, home of Joel Chandler Harris, author of the tales of Uncle Remus. Enjoy your night’s stay at the Georgian Terrace hotel, where Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh stayed while in town for the Gone with the Wind premiere.

Day 4

Visit Milledgeville, former state capital and stately town where Flannery O’Connor wrote all her most important works. Visit her family farm at Andalusia and see the room where she worked, then head downtown to see the O’Connor collection of memorabilia at her alma mater, Georgia College & State University.

Day 5

On the way out of town head to nearby Eatonton and visit the recreated boyhood home of Joel Chandler Harris, author of the Uncle Remus stories. Take the Alice Walker Driving Trail, highlighting important local sites in the life of the great African American author who also called Eatonton home. Tonight, you spend the night in Savannah, at the Hamilton-Turner Inn, once owned by “Mandy,” a character in John Berendt’s Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

Day 6

Tour the squares of downtown Savannah, including a stop at the Flannery O’Connor Childhood Home and the nearby, ornate Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, where she and her family attended mass. Enjoy lunch at Mrs. Wilkes’ Dining Room, mentioned prominently in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

Day 7

An hour away, walk around charming little Beaufort, South Carolina, which inspired so much of the work of novelist Pat Conroy. The grave of his father, James, a.k.a. “The Great Santini,” is in the National Cemetery near downtown. Stay the night in the historic Cuthbert House Inn, which hosted cast members such as Barbra Streisand during the filming of Prince of Tides.

Day 8

For an optional additional day, head to the “Holy City” of Charleston for a visit to Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island, where a young Edgar Allan Poe was stationed as a U.S. Army officer and inspired to write The Gold Bug. Eat a pub lunch at nearby Poe’s Tavern. Spend the rest of the day and evening in downtown Charleston, soaking up the atmosphere that inspired the tale Porgy and Bess, first novelized by native son DuBose Heyward and then popularized by George Gershwin’s opera.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Carolinas & Georgia.

The post Take a Literary Road Trip through the Carolinas and Georgia appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/11/take-a-literary-road-trip-through-the-carolinas-and-georgia/feed/ 0 16346
Slang in the ATL: From Hotlanta to The Hootch https://moon.com/2014/11/slang-in-the-atl-from-hotlanta-to-the-hootch/ https://moon.com/2014/11/slang-in-the-atl-from-hotlanta-to-the-hootch/#respond Wed, 05 Nov 2014 16:52:58 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=8921 Don't want to sound like a tourist? Wondering what Spaghetti Junction is? Get a quick language primer on Atlanta slang from Georgia native, Jim Morekis.

The post Slang in the ATL: From Hotlanta to The Hootch appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
A view of Turner Field stadium packed with fans.

Atlanta’s Turner Field is sometimes referred to as “The Ted.” Photo © LW Yang, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

Map of Atlanta

Atlanta

Don’t want to sound like a tourist? Wondering what Spaghetti Junction is? Get a quick language primer on Atlanta slang from Georgia native, Jim Morekis.

  • AJC: nickname for the city’s daily newspaper of record, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • The ATL: hip-hop slang for Atlanta.
  • Brookwood Split: the spot south of Buckhead where I-75 and I-85 separate north of the Connector.
  • The Connector: that portion of I-75 and I-85 that passes directly through the center of Downtown.
  • Dirty South: subgenre of hip-hop produced in the ATL.
  • Grady: shorthand for the hulking Downtown presence of Grady Memorial Hospital, the South’s premier trauma center. The Connector goes around it at the “Grady Curve.”
  • The Hootch: the Chattahoochee River. One “shoots the Hootch,” that is, rides a whitewater raft or tubes downstream. The Chattahoochee is also a key source of drinking water for Atlanta.
  • Hotlanta: Using this nickname for Atlanta will mark you as a tourist or a generally lame person. Avoid it at all costs.
  • L5P: acronym for Little Five Points.
  • Peachtree: generally refers to Peachtree Street, the historic north-south main avenue through the heart of Atlanta. Do not confuse it with the 70 other roads in Atlanta bearing some variant of “Peachtree.” Movers and shakers all wanted a prestigious address on Peachtree Street. If they couldn’t have that, nearby streets were named to feature the word, for example, Peachtree Circle, Peachtree Lane, and so on. Adding to the confusion is the fact that Peachtree Street becomes Peachtree Road in Buckhead. While Georgia is the Peach State, local folklore says Peachtree is probably a corruption of “pitch tree,” a pine tree used for sap.
  • The Perimeter: the vast swath of I-285 encircling the city and the demarcation between Atlanta proper and its fast-growing suburbs. Rush-hour traffic jams are the stuff of nightmares, with the northern portion, or “Top End,” the most congested.
  • Ponce: what locals call Ponce de Leon Avenue. The most upscale area during Atlanta’s Victorian heyday, this sinuous and now occasionally seamy street is a center of dining and nightlife. If you insist on the full name, avoid Spanish inflection and say “LEE-on.”
  • Spaghetti Junction: the sprawling 14-bridge cloverleaf that includes the intersection of “The Perimeter” (I-285) and I-85 and handles over 250,000 vehicles a day.
  • The Ted: nickname for Turner Field, home of the Atlanta Braves major league baseball team through 2017, when they move to the northern suburb of Cobb County. This is not to be confused with the nearby Georgia Dome, home of the Atlanta Falcons.

Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Carolinas & Georgia.

The post Slang in the ATL: From Hotlanta to The Hootch appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/11/slang-in-the-atl-from-hotlanta-to-the-hootch/feed/ 0 8921
Atlanta History: A “Coke-Cola” and a Smile https://moon.com/2014/10/atlanta-history-a-coke-cola-and-a-smile/ https://moon.com/2014/10/atlanta-history-a-coke-cola-and-a-smile/#respond Sat, 04 Oct 2014 17:50:10 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=8919 Learn about the history of Coca-Cola, Atlanta’s number-one export, from the origins of the brand name to its global expansion during World War II.

The post Atlanta History: A “Coke-Cola” and a Smile appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
A look at the bottling process at World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Georgia.

A look at the bottling process at World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Georgia. Photo © Betsy Weber, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

In the years after the Civil War, Atlanta was a boomtown, with its forward-looking business community using the city’s destruction as a reason to rebuild bigger and better. By 1868, Atlanta was the new capital of Georgia, and a year later a former Confederate officer and druggist from Columbus, Georgia, moved here seeking opportunity.

While the company is called Coca-Cola, Atlantans often ask to drink a “Coke-Cola.”John Pemberton was interested in the growing market for health tonics and hit upon a recipe using kola nut and coca leaf extracts. The first version was “French Wine Cola,” but one of Pemberton’s partners came up with “Coca-Cola,” and the world’s premier brand name was born.

Twenty years later Asa Griggs Candler bought Pemberton’s company and had two great ideas. First was the idea of selling the product—the ingredients of which were secret, as they are to this day—in syrup form, to be carbonated right at the soda fountain. The second was franchising bottling rights nationwide, which catapulted Coca-Cola to prominence and created a number of family fortunes.

When the Woodruff family acquired Coca-Cola in 1919, president Robert Woodruff set his sights on global expansion. During World War II, in a brilliant blend of patriotism and business savvy, he promised a five-cent bottle to every U.S. serviceman no matter where they were stationed. It was not only a step toward expanding into 200 countries; by gaining the label of “wartime production” Coca-Cola could circumvent the rationing of sugar, its syrup’s main ingredient!

Map of Downtown Atlanta

Downtown Atlanta

There’ve been missteps along the way, chiefly the “New Coke” debacle, humorously chronicled at the World of Coca-Cola (121 Baker St. NW, 404/676-5151, daily, hours vary, $16 adults, $12 children), where you can sample a room full of Coke products. The company got in trouble when it was revealed that its Dasani bottled water was just purified City of Atlanta tap water. While the company maintains the product never contained actual cocaine (the drug wasn’t made illegal until 1906), many analysts say it likely contained very minimal traces through the 1920s.

While the company is called Coca-Cola, Atlantans often ask to drink a “Coke-Cola.” Coca-Cola’s philanthropic legacy is felt in Atlanta today at the Robert Woodruff Memorial Arts Center, Emory University, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among many others. Individually, the late Robert Woodruff’s acts of philanthropy changed the face of the state, but exactly how much we may never know; most of his gifts are reckoned to be anonymous.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Carolinas & Georgia.

The post Atlanta History: A “Coke-Cola” and a Smile appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/10/atlanta-history-a-coke-cola-and-a-smile/feed/ 0 8919
The Allman Brothers Tour in Georgia https://moon.com/2014/10/the-allman-brothers-tour-in-georgia/ https://moon.com/2014/10/the-allman-brothers-tour-in-georgia/#respond Thu, 02 Oct 2014 17:57:32 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=8925 Perhaps no other musical name is so associated with Macon and middle Georgia as the Allman Brothers Band. The city is chock-full of Allman sites that have inspired pilgrimages for decades.

The post The Allman Brothers Tour in Georgia appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
View of the front of the the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House in Macon, Georgia.

Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House. Photo © Bubba73, licensed Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike.

Map of Macon

Macon

Though their family roots are actually in north Florida, perhaps no other musical name is so associated with Macon and middle Georgia as the Allman Brothers Band. Far ahead of their time musically in their sinuous and rhythmic blend of rock, blues, soul, and even country, they were also one of the first true multiracial bands.

Duane and Gregg Allman grew up as competing siblings, with Duane’s fiery personality and virtuosic slide guitar work driving their early success. Touring with what would become a close-knit bunch of friends in various incarnations through the mid- to late 1960s, the whole bunch ended up in Macon as the Allman Brothers Band. With the 1969 release of their eponymous debut album, nothing in the rock world, or in Macon, for that matter, was ever the same.

The city is chock-full of Allman sites that have inspired pilgrimages for decades. The band had various residences, including 309 College Street and 315 College Street, which was on the cover of the band’s first album. The most famous was the “Big House,” a large Tudor rented by bassist Berry Oakley and his wife, Linda, and memorialized today in the Allman Brothers Band Museum at the Big House (2321 Vineville Ave., 478/741-5551, Thurs.-Sun. 11am-6pm, $8 adults, $4 children), which opened in 2010.

Alas, the Allmans heyday was short-lived. In October 1971 Duane perished in a motorcycle crash at Hillcrest Avenue and Bartlett Street. Barely a year later, Oakley died in another motorcycle crash at Napier and Inverness Avenues. Both were only 24. Both are buried side by side at Rose Hill Cemetery. At Rose Hill you can also see two gravesites that inspired Allman songs, “Little Martha” Ellis and Elizabeth Napier Reed. The Bond tomb at Rose Hill was on the back cover of the band’s debut record.

Not all is gloom and doom, however. Down the road from the Big House you can have the best fried chicken and collard greens for miles around at H & H Restaurant (807 Forsyth St., 478/742-9810, Mon.-Sat. 6:30am-4pm, $12), where the band frequently ate and which features much Allmans memorabilia.

While in Macon, the band’s label was Capricorn Record (535 D.T. Walton Sr. Way/Cotton Ave.), which, though now in other hands, still retains the old signage and exterior. The actual Capricorn studios were at 536 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard; that exterior can be seen on the Allman Brothers Band at Fillmore East album.


Excerpted from the First Edition of Moon Carolinas & Georgia.

The post The Allman Brothers Tour in Georgia appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/10/the-allman-brothers-tour-in-georgia/feed/ 0 8925
Celebrating America’s Melting Pot https://moon.com/2014/07/celebrating-americas-melting-pot/ https://moon.com/2014/07/celebrating-americas-melting-pot/#respond Tue, 01 Jul 2014 20:16:58 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=14833 To celebrate Independence Day, here are some vibrant, living destinations from sea to shining sea where you can experience firsthand the diversity of America’s melting pot.

The post Celebrating America’s Melting Pot appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
A black and white photograph of a group of African Americans celebrating at a Fourth of July picnic.

A Fourth of July celebration on St. Helena Island, 1939.
Public domain photo by Marion Post Wolcott courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-USF33- 030417-M1.

On July 4, we celebrate not only the birth of our nation, but the birth of the ideals that make up the American Dream: equality, fairness, and the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It’s true that over the ensuing two centuries since 1776, many groups have had to struggle for their place in American society and fight for their rights. But it’s also true that the Founding Fathers had the foresight to create a blueprint for a robust future that would always remain adaptable to the changing needs of America’s changing population.

Here are some vibrant, living destinations from sea to shining sea where you can experience firsthand the diversity of America’s melting pot, with an appreciation not only for our stirring history of welcoming immigrants from all corners of the globe, but for our promising future.

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona

Pronounced “de shay,” Canyon de Chelly is a comparative rarity: a site managed by the National Park Service that lies within the borders of the Navajo Nation. As such, it offers an opportunity for insight into one of the West’s great geological displays, as well as into Native American culture. Various tribes from the Pueblo to the Hopi to the modern-day Navajo have lived there over the last four millennia.

Today, about 40 Navajo families still call the canyon home, and the tribe provides all the approved guides along the floor of the canyon’s high, red-tinged walls. Or you can opt for a self-guided trek on the “White House” trail, which takes you near an ancient cliffside adobe.

Camp for the night at the charming Spider Rock Campground. This delightfully laid-back spot is so far from urban light pollution that it offers some of the most amazing nighttime stargazing in the continental US. They even have a couple of traditional Navajo hogans available. Awake each morning to the soft sounds of native Navajo pipes played by the genial campground host, Mr. Howard Smith, before continuing on your Western journey. Just remember to hydrate!

A tall pillar of red rock juts skyward from the floor of a deep canyon with a massive plateau of rock visible behind it.

Spider Rock in Canyon de Chelly. Photo © Nazhiyath Vijayan, licensed Creative Commons Attribution No-Derivatives.

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Few places in the US feature such an interesting and lively confluence of culture as the capital of New Mexico. As a center of Hispanic culture, it’s much older than the United States itself, with a founding dating back to 1610 and first European contact even before that. Santa Fe still has a European outlook today, and despite the local culinary emphasis on the state’s trademark spicy chiles, it’s culturally an heir to the tradition of old Spain.

The Palace of the Governors on the main square, which is now the state history museum, and the nearby St. Francis Cathedral are the no-brainer stops downtown.

For a more detailed look at area culture, Santa Fe’s “Museum Hill” on the east side of town features three conveniently located sites: the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, and the Museum of International Folk Art. The latter is probably the most compelling for both kids and adults, and an amazing place to gorge oneself on the unique culture of the region.

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts downtown highlights more current contributions from regional Native American artists.

Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico also highlight existing Native American culture, particularly the eight northern Pueblos, still occupied as they’ve been for many millennia. You’re welcome to visit each of the Pueblos, but be sure to observe proper etiquette, particularly if you’re visiting during their frequent festival days—these are religious events as well. Visit santafe.org for more info.

A vertical vintage theater sign reads Castro in neon letters.

San Francisco’s famous Castro Theatre. Photo © Fabien David, licensed Creative Commons Attribution No-Derivatives.

Castro District, San Francisco, California

While the city by the bay has changed a lot from its early days as a center of gay and lesbian culture in America, San Francisco remains in many ways the spiritual home of the nation’s LGBT community. At its core, as from the first days, is the Castro District, named for the neighborhood’s main street.

Still owned by the same family that built it, the Castro Theatre on the 400 block frequently hosts special screenings and film festivals. This includes the San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival each June, which is concurrent with the always-epic San Francisco Pride Week, centering in the Castro.

Milk, the biopic of Harvey Milk, the first openly gay elected official in America, had its world premiere at the Castro Theatre in 2008. Nods to Milk abound throughout the neighborhood. Harvey Milk Plaza is at the entrance to the rapid transit, or Muni, station. Milk’s old camera store—also his campaign headquarters—is at 575 Castro Street.

The intersection of Castro Street and 18th Street remains the center of most activity in the neighborhood, from parades to street fairs to outdoor performances. Supposedly San Francisco’s first gay bar and an official historic landmark, Twin Peaks Tavern is at the intersection of Castro and Market.

Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site, Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia, is one of the epicenters of the American civil rights movement, due in large part to the enormous influence of native son Martin Luther King, Jr. One of the most expansive National Park Service offerings within an urban environment, the MLK Jr. National Historic Site is sort of a consortium of several sites, all within walking distance in downtown Atlanta.

The main Visitors Center should be your first stop, with its stirring historic exhibits about the life and tragic death of King, as well as the permanent “Children of Courage” exhibit. Across historic “Sweet Auburn” Avenue is the Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church where King preached, and where his mother was tragically murdered in the sanctuary three years after her son’s assassination. (Historic Ebenezer is now dedicated purely to the memory of King; the congregation worships in a new sanctuary near the Visitors Center.)

Right next door is the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, which hosts the burial site of King. You can pay your respects at the tomb and its Eternal Flame, and visit the King Center’s Freedom Hall exhibits, which are open to the public.

For many visitors, though, the most poignant and worthwhile destination on Auburn Avenue is the King historical home, restored with period pieces to resemble how it would have looked as MLK and his siblings grew up there in the 1930s. Tours are free but are first-come, first-served and book up very early. Sign up at the Visitors Center immediately when it opens at 9am or else you’ll probably be out of luck.

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Yes, it’s part of the US, and no, you don’t need a passport to go there. Founded by the Spanish in 1521, Puerto Rico’s capital city is older than the United States itself. It’s a great blend of American and Hispanic history and vibrant modern culture, art, and design.

Old San Juan is a formerly walled city that is home to more than 400 Spanish colonial-era buildings. The beautiful Catedral de San Juan Batista is the second-oldest cathedral in the Western Hemisphere. The little Pablo Casals Museum is the late cellist’s gift to the city, a collection of his memorabilia and papers.

For a more bustling experience, visit the Plaza Del Mercado in the hip Santurce District. The “Placita” is part public market, part sizzling nightlife hub.

Ecotourists will enjoy a side trip a short drive east of San Juan to the El Yunque Rain Forest, the only such ecosystem within a National Park Service site. If you’re seeking sunny outdoors playtime instead, visit the nearby Ocean Park beach, where many locals go to get a break from the city.

Blue painted cobblestones in the foreground with a row of colonial buildings.

Blue cobblestoned streets are common in Old San Juan. Photo © Steven Gaertner.

Penn School, St. Helena Island, South Carolina

One of the historic sea islands of South Carolina, charming St. Helena Island—a short drive from the classic and genteel town of Beaufort—offers unique insight into the ways of the Gullah people, descendants of emancipated slaves who continue to maintain their unique traditional culture.

The center of this culture for visitors is the Penn School. Begun by northern missionaries during the Civil War right after the Union occupation of the area in 1862, the school was specifically intended for the children of freed slaves—the first such institution in America. It ceased to be a school in 1948, and the Penn School morphed into a sort of a clearinghouse for Gullah culture.

For a brief period in the ‘60s, it was a center of the US Civil Rights Movement, hosting Martin Luther King, Jr. for planning sessions. In modern times, the Penn School has provided legal assistance to local Gullah homeowners who are often pressured to sell their homes to developers, occasionally by having their deeds challenged.

Today you can visit the York Bailey Museum, one of 17 historic structures on the beautiful moss-draped campus. The annual Heritage Days celebration each November brings Gullah food, music, dance, and storytelling to the Penn School for a delightful good time for the whole family.

The post Celebrating America’s Melting Pot appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/07/celebrating-americas-melting-pot/feed/ 0 14833
2014 Pride Events in Chicago, New York City, St. Petersburg, San Francisco, and Atlanta https://moon.com/2014/06/2014-pride-events-in-chicago-new-york-city-st-petersburg-san-francisco-and-atlanta/ https://moon.com/2014/06/2014-pride-events-in-chicago-new-york-city-st-petersburg-san-francisco-and-atlanta/#respond Fri, 20 Jun 2014 19:24:04 +0000 http://moon.com/?p=14579 Commemorating the Stonewall riots, June is LGBT Pride month. Here are a few upcoming events in the United States, including cities like Chicago and San Francisco.

The post 2014 Pride Events in Chicago, New York City, St. Petersburg, San Francisco, and Atlanta appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
Six people standing in a row each wearing a different color of the rainbow, their costumes made out of long noodle balloons.

The 2012 “Same Rainbow” Pride Parade in San Francisco. Photo © Torbakhopper, licensed Creative Commons Attribution

Commemorating the Stonewall riots, June is LGBT Pride month. Here are a few upcoming events in the United States.


Chicago, IL: June 21–29

Chicago Pride consists of two weekends of huge celebrations. To kick off the first day of the festival on Saturday, June 21, Oscar-winning actress, Grammy-winning singer, and Chicago native, Jennifer Hudson will be performing. The excitement of the festival continues with two days of drag shows, a pet parade, and more than thirteen performers. If you like to run (or walk), be check out the annual lakefront 5k and 10k races on Saturday, June 28. Hungry after the run? Fill your cravings at the food truck fest. After refueling, put on your best sports costume and get to Neverland, the Summer Olympics-themed costume party with international DJs Ivan Gomez and Alex Acosta. Finally, at 12pm on Sunday, June 29, you can’t miss the Pride parade through Boystown.


Looking up at rainbow balloons strung in arches on a street with the Empire State Building in the background.

Gay Pride Parade NYC 2013. Photo © Bob Jagendorf, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

New York, NY: June 24–29

The city that is larger than life will be celebrating the theme “We Have Won When We’re One.” On Saturday, June 28, the Hudson Terrace (an exclusive, modern nightclub and upscale lounge with killer views) will hold the VIP Rooftop Party, one of the hottest events for men. If you’re feeling lucky, continue the night at the Hammerstein Ballroom for the extravagant Spain’s WE Party: Casino. The same night, Teaze will be the official Pride dance party for women. (It was formerly known as Rapture on the River.)

On Sunday, June 29, Laverne Cox will be one of the grand marshals of the annual civil rights demonstration. Demonstrators will march with over 50 colorful floats lighting up the concrete jungle along 5th Avenue to end at Greenwich Village. Browse around at the PrideFest street fair following the march for some delicious food and music. That evening, end Pride Week at Dance on the Pier with DJ Grind, DJ Pagano, and a performance from Demi Lovato. You won’t miss the rainbow sky during the grand finale fireworks.


St. Petersburg, FL: June 27–29

Start the weekend off with the 27/82 fundraising concert on Friday, June 28, and enjoy performances by Hunter Valentine, Mary Lambert, and Connor Zwetsch. On Saturday, June 29, there will be food, drinks, and music at St. Pete’s largest block party as a warm-up for the parade. When the sun starts setting, the vibrant parade will take off. Finish off the weekend with the Pride Festival—you’ll get to meet new people as you explore the vendors along Central Avenue.


San Francisco, CA: June 28–29

San Francisco knows how to celebrate like no other. Get ready to “Color Our World with Pride” at the largest LGBT gathering in the nation on the weekend of June 28 and 29. With a main stage and 23 community-run stages, there will be tons of performances for all interests on Saturday, June 28. Witness floats and people wearing fancy costumes at the legendary parade along Market Street on Sunday, June 29.

Ready to party? The options are countless. She Said SF is hosting several lesbian events on Friday, June 27, and Saturday, June 28. The biggest Pride party in the city’s history is the WE Party: Prison of Love at the Armory on Saturday as well. On Sunday, you can catch Quentin Harris at Poolside Pride Party at The Phoenix Hotel.


Atlanta, GA: October 11–12

Unlike all other cities, Atlanta Pride Festival is in the fall during National Coming Out Day weekend. If you like cocktails, don’t miss an amazing cocktail party held in the world’s largest aquarium for the Official Atlanta Pride Kick Off Party on Friday, October 10. The festival itself takes place over the weekend in Piedmont Park, culminating in a parade on Sunday, October 12. (See the Atlanta Pride website for further details.)

The post 2014 Pride Events in Chicago, New York City, St. Petersburg, San Francisco, and Atlanta appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/06/2014-pride-events-in-chicago-new-york-city-st-petersburg-san-francisco-and-atlanta/feed/ 0 14579
Atlanta for LGBT Travelers https://moon.com/2014/05/atlanta-for-lgbt-travelers/ https://moon.com/2014/05/atlanta-for-lgbt-travelers/#respond Tue, 27 May 2014 22:01:00 +0000 http://moon.com?p=11510&preview_id=11510 Atlanta has long been recognized as the gay capital of the Southeast, a tolerant oasis that draws queer residents and tourists from all over the country. Find information on bars, clubs, gay-friendly shops, and more.

The post Atlanta for LGBT Travelers appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
The Atlanta Pride Parade.

The Atlanta Pride Parade. Photo © Jason Reidy, licensed Creative Commons Attribution.

Atlanta has long been recognized as the gay capital of the Southeast, a tolerant oasis that draws queer residents and tourists from all over the country. The city’s enormous annual Pride celebration began in 1971 and today brings in hundreds of thousands of revelers to the city, with a deluge of events happening around Piedmont Park each autumn. Atlanta also hosts one of the world’s largest Black Gay Pride festivals each year over Labor Day weekend. Out on Film, the gay film festival, takes place each spring, while the Atlanta Queer Literary Festival presents sporadic programming throughout the year.

For decades, Atlanta’s most visible gay neighborhood was Midtown—especially around the intersection of Piedmont Avenue and 10th Street—with its concentration of bars and gay-friendly shops and restaurants.For decades, Atlanta’s most visible gay neighborhood was Midtown—especially around the intersection of Piedmont Avenue and 10th Street—with its concentration of bars and gay-friendly shops and restaurants. While one of the city’s much-loved gay landmarks, Outwrite Bookstore, has since closed, local favorites Blake’s on the Park and Gilbert’s Mediterranean Café remain as packed as ever. Recent years have found Midtown becoming more mixed and gay Atlantans less confined to any one part of town, with queer bars and businesses popping up from Decatur to Marietta.

Lesbians in Atlanta have an enviable resource in Little Five Points with Charis Books and More, a fixture that’s served the feminist community for three decades. Charis Circle, its programming arm, hosts a vibrant assortment of events and workshops. The city has had less luck keeping a girls-only nightlife scene afloat over the years. My Sister’s Room in East Atlanta deserves major props for outlasting the odds.

Map of Atlanta

Atlanta

For gay men, the bar and club scene in Atlanta offers several options on any given night of the week. Mary’s in East Atlanta has been cited as one of the best gay bars in the country, drawing an eclectic clique of hipsters and bears. Burkhart’s Pub (1492 Piedmont Ave., 404/872-4403, Mon.-Fri. 4 p.m.-3 a.m., Sat. 2 p.m.-3 a.m., Sun. 2 p.m.-midnight, no cover) is full of the blue-jeans-and-ball-cap crowd; it shares a parking lot with Felix’s on the Square (1510 Piedmont Ave., 404/249-7899, Mon.-Fri. 2 p.m.-2:30 a.m., Sat. noon-2:30 a.m., Sun. 12:30 p.m.-midnight, no cover) and Oscar’s Atlanta (1510 Piedmont Ave., 404/815-8841, Mon.-Sat. 2 p.m.-3 a.m. no cover). Bulldogs Bar (893 Peachtree St., 404/872-3025, Mon.-Sat. 4 p.m.-3 a.m., no cover) remains a longtime favorite for African-American men. The leather scene congregates at the Atlanta Eagle (306 Ponce de Leon Ave., 404/873-2453, Mon.-Fri. 7 p.m.-3 a.m., Sat. 5 p.m.-3 a.m., cover varies, up to $5), but it’s become far more mixed as a younger crowd has cycled in.

The biggest and most popular gay dance club, The Jungle Club Atlanta is the go-to spot for touring DJs and theme nights. The Heretic (2069 Cheshire Bridge Rd., 404/325-3061, Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-3 a.m. cover varies, up to $10), an Atlanta standard for more than two decades, still knows how to fill a dance floor on weekends.

Gay travelers should check out the Atlanta Gay and Lesbian Travel Guide, a portal operated by the Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau that features a wealth of listings for lodging, events, and community organizations. The city’s main gay publications, GA Voice and David Atlanta, are also handy resources.


Excerpted from the Second Edition of Moon Atlanta.

The post Atlanta for LGBT Travelers appeared first on Moon Travel Guides.

]]>
https://moon.com/2014/05/atlanta-for-lgbt-travelers/feed/ 0 11510